Search Results For

Neil Patel

Lifestyle

Neil Patel – Travel Story

Neil Patel Travel Podcast Show Notes

Neil Patel Accolades

Chances are if you listen to marketing podcasts, “Marketing School” with Neil Patel and Eric Siu is at the top of your list. It’s my number one favorite show. Beyond his role as a podcasting icon, Neil is co-founder of Crazy Egg, Hello Bar, and KISSmetrics and he also helps companies like Amazon, NBC, GM, HP, and Viacom grow their business.

The Wall Street Journal refers to Neil as a top influencer on the web and Forbes says he’s one of the top 10 online marketers. The accolades don’t stop there. Entrepreneur Magazine says he created one of the 100 MOST BRILLIANT companies in the world.

Recognition and Awards

Neil was recognized as a top 100 entrepreneur under the age of 30 by President Obama and one of the top 100 entrepreneurs under the age of 35 by the United Nations. He was also awarded Congressional Recognition from the United States House of Representatives.

And, yes, Neil Patel is a busy man with a family and full schedule that requires him to travel for business. I interviewed him bright and early one morning a few weeks ago via Zoom. He resides in California with his wife and daughter.

Welcome to Neil Patel, my first guest in the Everything, Everywhere, Travel Guest series.

The Perfect Getaway

As you know, our podcast is about travel. But first, how’s life in California today?

California is great. It’s sunny and it doesn’t get too hot or too cold. It’s a nice place to be.

Let’s talk about travel, Neil. In one of your marketing school episodes you and your co-host, Eric Siu, talked about your work schedules. I’m wondering if you allow time from your hectic schedule to get away and relax. Or is work always a part of your life?

Neil Patel: Work is always a part of my life and even when I’m relaxing, I still work because if I don’t work I’m not able to relax. I need to get a bare minimum of work done each day. I do set aside time to spend with my family and travel but not really much with vacations. A lot of times I’ll have to go to countries like Indonesia and random places like that or places in Europe like Germany, London, or Paris. A lot of times, depending on where I’m going, I’ll consider taking my family as well and we’ll try to do some family activities as well as doing my work-related stuff.

Your answer brings me to my next question. What is your idea of the perfect getaway or vacation?

Neil Patel: My idea of the perfect getaway is to stay at home, watch TV, and relax with the family. You’re probably wondering, WAIT! That’s not a getaway but I’ve been on the road so much, and I’ve been to so many different countries that sometimes being at home is really relaxing. There were times when I was on the road for literally 40-plus weeks out of the year.

I imagine you get tired of it (travel).

Neil Patel: Definitely, it’s exhausting. It takes a lot out of you. That’s why staying at home is quite nice.

I read you were born in London and your parents moved to Orange County, California when you were about two-years-old. Was traveling a part of your life as a child and young adult?

Neil Patel: When I was younger, we didn’t really travel much. My parents didn’t have a ton of money so travel really wasn’t a part of my life as a child or even when I was a teenager.

Overall, how would you say travel has affected your life?

Neil Patel: Travel has affected my life in a good way, which has opened me up to new cultures and experiences. I’ve learned a lot just from traveling about in the world and how different things work.

Where are some of your favorite places you’ve visited?

Neil Patel: I like New York City although that’s just in the United States. I like going back to India. I’m of Indian descent so that helps. I love going back to the U.K. France is amazing. If I had to pick one, I’d probably say Oslo or Italy. Those would be my top two choices.

This brings me to my main question. Is there a particular trip or adventure you’ve recently taken that has changed or altered your life?

Not recently but there was one in the past years going back four or five years ago. I went to Brazil and it really opened my eyes. I really was in awe. There are so many people all over the world and there’s so much opportunity. Going to Brazil didn’t make me think I could only do this in Brazil but it opened up my eyes to business. I don’t know why it was so much more on that trip. It could be because there are different people from parts of the world but it made me realize I need to start doing more overseas. I’ve been to all these countries, so why not start working with a lot of the companies there. There are so many talented people and so much to learn from being in different countries.

Was that trip for business or pleasure?

Neil Patel: It was business but I tried to make some fun out of it. Business and some sightseeing and some tours but it was literally almost all work.

What were some of the sites you visited while you were there and what would you say about that country overall?

Neil Patel: In Brazil, there are a few things I ended up seeing. First off, there’s this place called Ouro Preto. There’s also this city with a lot of artwork. It was an art scene but also a big farming town and they have a lot of museums. The farming town was pretty close to Belo. Those are the two main things I saw on my first trip.

Neil Patel family spending time together
Neil referred to his idea of the perfect getaway as spending time with his family. Photo courtesy of Neil Patel.

Outside of work, what are some of your other interests? Outside of digital marketing?

Neil Patel: Hanging out with friends and family. I love watching basketball games. I love walking and talking with my wife. Catching up with her…And going to the library quite often with my daughter. It’s fun as well for me.

Neil Patel and his daughter spend time together during the holidays
Spending time with his family is at the top of his to-do list. Photo courtesy of Neil Patel

Is there anything else you’d like to say about your Brazil trip or any other one you’ve taken that have affected your life.

Neil Patel: If you’re going to travel, I’d say be open-minded and try to experience the country as the locals would. I think a lot of people are very close-minded and they’re stuck in their ways when traveling. You can understand the culture and the community if you’re open-minded.

What is your favorite culture you’ve visited? You mentioned Italy.

Neil Patel: For Italy, the culture is amazing but my favorite part about it was walking around.

What is one travel tip or advice you give my readers?

Neil Patel: If you’re going to travel, experience things as a local. If you do, you’ll have a better understanding of the culture versus doing the touristy type of stuff.

End of Interview

Heartfelt thanks to Neil for his time and interest in the Everything, Everywhere, Travel Guest series. Excerpts from his podcast will be available next week.

Visit Neil’s website to learn more about the digital marketing services he offers.

Did you enjoy the interview? Leave a comment here.

Learn how to interview with a course I’ve created that’s loaded with essential interviewing skills and tips.

Recommend someone for an upcoming travel story.

Are you looking for the perfect destination getaway? Click here for airline promotions and travel information from Qatar Airways.

If this interview with Neil Patel makes you want to start your own blog and online store, look at SiteGround’s hosting plans. I couldn’t be happier with their service and plans.

Please note some of the links in this post are affiliate links. I will earn a commission if you make a purchase but at no additional cost to you.
No Comments
Florida destinations Lifestyle

A Journey Across The Overseas Highway

"A Journey Across The Overseas Highway"

Papa Dobles, Key Lime Pie, Papa Hemingway, and Key Lime Seafood Penne

What You’ll Find in Islamorada: The Fishing Capital of the World

Everything, Everywhere, Travel Writer Guest Series Marcella Nardi
By Dr. Joe Leonardi

Warning: “A Journey Across The Overseas Highway” spells out food descriptions that might provoke you to immediately book a trip to Islamorada.

This week, I welcome Dr. Joe Leonardi, a Chiropractor from Kingston, Pennsylvania, and the author of several books in the Historical and Realistic Fiction genres. Joe is a one-time candidate for congress, an educator, and his greatest pride, a non-combat United States Navy veteran.

Islamorada in the Florida Keys
Dr. Joe Leonardi is a Pennsylvania chiropractor with a love for travel. The Florida Keys rank high on his list of favorite Florida destinations. But there’s more…the Key Lime Pie, Key Lime Penne Pasta and other food selections every Florida traveler must experience.

Begin Your Journey to Islamorada

A jolt as the wheels touch down. The roar of engines as they go into reverse. The jetliner slows and taxis to the jetway. The flight captain announces for us to remain seated until the plane comes to a complete stop. I don’t think I’ve heard a more useless announcement because as we are rolling along, people spring from their seats and unlatch overhead compartments as if they can exit before the doors open.

We sit and chuckle at the hurried crowd. When those around us have finally moved away, we get up. I reach above and grab two simple duffels and we are last out the door.

One step across the metal threshold and the heavy, hot, close Miami air greets us with a welcoming hug. It feels good as it penetrates old bones that have been enduring a Northeast Pennsylvania winter.

We are not at our eventual destination, and because overpacking is not a necessity, we skip the throngs at the baggage carousel and head straight to the car rental place. Being a preferred member allows a straight shot to the garage. My old friend, whose name I do not know, who is here on each of my trips greets me with a broad smile and tips his hat to you.

Beaches in Islamorada in The Florida Keys
Florida has beaches that draw millions of visitors each year. While you’re in the Florida Keys, there’s a restaurant Joe ranks high on his list of favorite places to eat. Scroll down to read more about “Marker 88” and the BEST Key Lime Pie in the continental United States.

“Your car is ready.” He hands me the key, and we shake hands.

The top is already down. He knows me too well. We exit down an angled ramp and find our way to Florida’s Turnpike. Of course, as I have done on each of my ventures to the sunshine state, I have forgotten sunglasses. It isn’t long before we arrive at the same convenience store where I have purchased at least a dozen pairs of dark lenses to protect my eyes. I get you a pair, even though you were smart enough to take yours.  I always marvel that this is the only store I have ever been to which is on the left side of a highway.

Sunglasses – check.
Shirts changed to lightly colored tank tops – check.
Sunscreen applied – check.

A couple of bananas and a few bottles of water now occupy the back seat and we are ready to continue south. You see my friends, this installment is not about the destination, but about the journey. A journey along one of the most scenic roads one can ever drive and an interesting stop or two along the way.

But before we begin, we take a moment to just sit in the car taking in the warmth and sunshine. Scanning the radio for a Latin music station, we must set the proper Miami mood. Once I find one, the driving beat of Gloria Estefan Turns The Beat Around, so I turn the key and let the plugs spark fuel to fire, set my foot heavy upon the accelerator and roar back onto the turnpike.

Wind whipping.
Music blaring.
Sun beating.

I smile and joke, “Toto, we aren’t in frozen Pennsylvania any longer.”

We were not on the road for half an hour when I suggest we make a stop at roadside attraction I have often wanted to visit, but never before made the time. You are game. I put the Coral Castle in my phone’s GPS and after a couple of turns, we are on The Dixie Highway pulling up to the limestone structure.

Walking along the outside, my hand rubs the rough structure. It has weathered much in its nearly century of standing. Admittance is paid, and once inside, we are mesmerized by the tale of how a lone, slight man, with no advanced tools, nor anyone’s assistance, built this monument to a love who broke his heart. Every part of the structure is made from the limestone he magically moved and crafted. Chairs, a bed, stairs, and sculptures all the same coral. We are informed there are many myths as to how this solitary person put together this magnificent structure.

“He had an unrivaled working of physics, so much so, he was able to perfectly balance the heavy, revolving door that keeps the outside world from entering, but can be spun upon its axis with little nothing more than a solitary finger.”

It is fascinating, and while I would like to know more, I don’t think I will bother to research any of the truth behind it. After witnessing this man-made wonder, it is much more fun to believe the myths of its creation than try and find out what may be the truth. Who knows, perhaps the truth is not out there.

Before heading out I crack open a bottle of water which has warmed considerably in the Florida sun. A banana hits the spot and gives much-needed potassium before we head back on the road south.

A quick jaunt by Florida City and the end of the peninsula is near. The turnpike has melded into US 1 and much of the surrounding area is desolate, but the ocean is in view and we are crossing a bridge that is elevating above the water. Beneath us the sea is calm and tranquil, as we crest the top, the first of the Florida Keys, Key Largo, welcomes us and our journey upon The Overseas Highway. There is where it begins.

Here traffic slows as the small town is overflowing with tourists. This is a big area for diving. One day we must make a stop, but today our stomachs are growling so I keep on the road. Islamorada is but a mere 15 miles, but traffic is heavy, so it may take another 30 or so minutes to reach a favored spot for a late lunch.

A sign welcomes us to Islamorada and lets us know we are now in “The Fishing Capital of The World.”  At this time of day, the traffic is now light, most are out experiencing deep sea fishing, and the usual lunch hours have ended. I see Lion’s Lair, a specialty swimwear and intimate apparel business that has managed to take hundreds of my hard-earned dollars over the years for travel companions. Today we have no need, but it is a tell-tale sign that our eating destination is less than a few minutes away.

Or sooner. I have been to the “Marker 88” restaurant more than a dozen times, and yet, each time, the entrance sneaks up on me. I hit the brakes hard, downshift and make a sudden ninety-degree angle right turn onto the long driveway. My empty and rumbling stomach leaps into my throat and then settles quickly as it knows what to soon expect.

The car comes to a rest. The lingering smell of asbestos tickles the nose but does nothing to deter appetites. This is the best time to come. The lunch crowd is gone and there isn’t a soul in the place. Well, there is one soul in the place.

“Joe, is that you? I was just thinking it is time for one of your visits.”

It still amazes me; the people I see a handful of times a year know me better than many back home.

“Hi Lori, too cold up north.”

She smiles, “I know. When are you just going to up and move down here?”

I give her the same answer as always. “Soon.”

“Well, you know the routine, you have the place to yourself. I will bring out your Papa Dobles and menus.”

As we walk through the restaurant, we head out back to the beautiful body of water where the Gulf of Mexico forms the Florida Bay. Glider-style tables dot the sea. Lowering our bulk into one causes the metal to groan as it gently sways as we settle in.

The sea air is fresh and cooler and less humid than the air that greeted us at the airport. The beach is one of the few natural ones in the Keys. Most of the beaches require sand to be shipped in for the tourists to sun themselves.

Alongside a refreshing Papa Dobles is an appetizer of sweet potato fries. The deep orange potato, fried to a crisp texture, covered in salt, is giving off an enticing aroma.  We take a fry and gingerly bite into it.  It snaps as teeth break the surface.  The inside releases a small burst of hot steam warning us to blow on it before our next bite.

As we peruse the menu, the sun drifts from directly overhead and takes a temporary spot over the bay. In a few short hours, people will line all points west to watch her dazzling display of beauty as she sets beneath the ocean.

As we finish the fries, fresh Papa Dobles appear in front of us as well as plates of Key Lime Seafood Penne that we didn’t order, but Lori knew that was what we were getting. Honestly, what could be more Florida Keys than freshly caught lobster, shrimp, and blue crab mixed with penne pasta in a key lime-Tabasco butter sauce.

The savory scent of melted butter mixes with the tart tang bouquet of key lime. The heat from Tabasco opens our nasal passages in such a way that the fragrance overwhelms.  After another deep breath, we dig right in.  The sweet, tender lobsters melt in our mouths.  Not wanting to miss even the slightest morsel, both fork and spoon are a necessity.  We take a quick look around and we are still the only ones in the place. so bowls are lifted, brought to mouths, and with slurping sounds, we finish off the remaining sauce. Butter streaks our chins as the delicious broth passes our lips.

As our plates are cleared, a walk along a pier that juts out over the bay is a must. Standing out over the sea, the water is crystal clear. Various sea life is visible moving about. Not too far off, what appears to be a nurse shark taking a break from the ocean floor, is sunning him, or her, self. The sun’s light reflects at us at such an odd angle, we squint until the dorsal fin drops beneath the surface.

Dessert is the next order of the day, and there is no reason to ask what we are having. As we retake our seats, set on the table is truly the best Key Lime Pie in all The Keys, if not the world. This pie is more than simply a key lime filling atop some type of crust, no — atop this filling, made with freshly squeezed key lime juice, are several inches of snow-white meringue. The fluffy topping has a sugary coat beckoning us to plunge in our forks. As the tines pass through the filling and break the graham crust, the scent of that fresh key lime juice escapes its confinement. We raise a portion to our mouths; the sweet but tart bouquet tickles our noses causing us to immediately place the decedent dessert into our mouths. We allow it to sit on our tongues, the intense flavors reawaken our appetites. Slowly chewing, a loud pleasurable moan is all the expression necessary. 

I order up a pitcher of Papa Dobles. Lori asks if we are staying next door. I nod my head yes. She tells me I can leave the car in the lot; she takes my keys and will put the top up and tells me she will have them for me at breakfast.

The drink of Papa Hemingway continues to relax as much as the warm breeze blowing in off the ocean.

Our next installment will take us the rest of the way down The Overseas Highway where we will explore the Southernmost Point in the Continental United States.

Short Story Scribe by Joe Leonardi
Joe Leonardi’s website, ShortStoryScribe.com

Visit Joe’s website, ShortStoryScribe.com to get your hands copies of his books that reveal his fascination with storytelling.

Sponsor this post or a podcast episode. Get the details about how you can promote your business here at joanmatsuitravelwriter.com.

A Journey Across The Overseas Highway is one of many travel stories created for the Everything, Everywhere, Travel Guest series, a weekly feature that shines a light on travelers from around the world and all walks of life. Here’s a companion story you’ll love by Neil Patel, a digital marketing icon.

Get information about SiteGround Web Hosting. You truly won’t be sorry you switched to SiteGround. I made the switch last year and immediately reaped the awards: a faster load time, heightened web security, and outstanding customer service. Cut the amount of time and money you spend on web hosting.

No Comments

Travel Podcast Show Notes

Neil Patel Travel Podcast Show Notes

Everything, Everywhere, Travel Writer Podcast 

Episode 1: Neil Patel

The Perfect Getaway

Date: April 15, 2020

Episode: 1

Title: Neil Patel Travel Story

Subtitle: The Perfect Getaway

Final Show Link: 


In this episode of the Everything, Everywhere, Travel Writer, Neil Patel, digital marketing icon and entrepreneur, describes how work is always a part of his life and travel for work related-purposes is essential to his business. 


Does Neil allow time from his hectic schedule to relax? 


Yes, but if he doesn’t work, he’s not able to relax. 


Business trips take him to random places like Indonesia or oftentimes, Europe — Germany, London or Paris. Depending on where he’s going, his family joins him and they try to include family activities on top of work. 


What’s his idea of the perfect getaway? You’ll be surprised by his answer so tune in to the show to get the details.  


How does he deal with spending so much time on the road? Find out what he does in his free time.


He reveals his favorite place to relax after days and weeks of business travel. It’s typically not the exotic location you might expect. 


How has travel affected his life? Neil fills us in with details about what he’s learned while “on the go” for business? 


What are some of his favorite places? New York City is one of the United States destinations he loves but he has traveled extensively around the globe. 


What is one travel tip or advice he gives my listeners? Neil gives travel tips to encourage you to get the most of your trip while avoiding the “touristy type” sights. 


A heartfelt thanks to Neil for his time and interest in the Everything, Everywhere, Travel Guest series. He’s a gracious and patient person who loves to teach and share his knowledge. We recorded our podcast more than two months ago and in the meantime, after COVID-19 wreaked havoc, we ran into production, editing and sound quality issues that were somewhat resolved. Please be patient with us as moving forward is a constant work in progress.

Prefer to read a full transcript of his podcast, click here.  

Visit Neil’s website to learn more about the digital marketing services he offers.

We’d love to hear from all our listeners. Please visit our Contact Page and let us know how we can help you today!


Follow our Podcast

Podcasts air every Wednesday. Check back next week for our second episode with a celebrity broadcast journalist who shares his stories from the road.

Join the Conversation

Our favorite part of recording a live podcast each week is participating in the great conversations that happen on our live chat, on social media, and in our comments section.  Join in or start your own conversation about the podcasts on our Facebook page.


This week’s question is:

Where can you find marketing advice during troubled times? 

Explore these Resources

In this episode, we mentioned the following resources:

Check Out More Digital Programming to help you learn and grow as a travel writer and journalist.


Need a Presenter?

  • Earning five newspaper association awards and navigating through more than four decades in the journalism world has taught me countless lessons. Sharing my knowledge with budding journalists through a variety of “channels” is my way of bridging the gap. Contact me to learn more about my services that range from small group coaching to workshops.
Show Notes Page Sponsor a Travel Podcast at joanmatsuitravelwriter.com
Show your support! Sponsor an Everything, Everywhere, Travel Guest Post and Podcast

Voice over by Yoshi Matsui.

Looking for a lesson to get you started, check out one of my courses.

No Comments
Everything, Everywhere Travel Guest Series Everything, Everywhere, Travel Writer Everything, Everywhere, Travel Writer Podcast Transcriptions and Guest Series Guest Travel Writers Lifestyle Travel Stories Travel Writer

Mike Stevens

Mike Stevens Shooting the Breeze an interview with a multi-talented Pennsylvania Journalist

Shooting the Breeze

Travel Stories from the Road

Mike Stevens and I met a few years ago when I interviewed him for a newspaper feature story I was working on. Our interview at WNEP-TV was an exciting moment for two reasons. I’d watched Mike for years interview interesting people from all walks of life as he did what comes naturally to him. He loves to “shoot the breeze.” He’s also such an unpretentious, easy-going person. The podcast episode was my second interview with Mike Stevens. Scroll down to read the digital version of our podcast episode.

Mike Stevens Shooting the Breeze is an entertaining and enlightening journey into broadcast journalism with Mike Stevens, a well-known Pennsylvania journalist.

Introduction

Joan: My guest today is a fellow journalist whom I admire and respect for many reasons. He’s best known as the host of “On the Pennsylvania Road,” a long-running segment on WNEP-TV. He’s also an author, educator, and storyteller and he also shares my love for interviewing people from all walks of life.

Mike Stevens Shooting the Breeze and Sharing Stories from the Pennsylvania road.

Welcome, Mike Stevens.

INTERVIEW

And thank you for meeting me today a Keystone College. How are you, Mike?

Mike: Well, I’m good. I’m good, Joan. I’m kind of retired and sort of working on different things here and there and you know, it’s fun to get together and shoot the breeze.

Joan: For my listeners who don’t know you I would say you are the ideal person to share your experiences as an itinerant traveler, and that’s what I’d like to do today.

Joan: Also, I’d like you to tell me about your life now and what you’re doing. What are you working on?

Mike: Oh, well, I’m doing a podcast occasionally for “16” and I do a blog so I try to write every week or so when I have the opportunity and something strikes my fancy. and that’s about it. I’m thinking about going for a ride somewhere pretty soon. And that’s about it so far and goofing off most of the time.

Joan: When you were the host of on the road how many towns throughout the state do you estimate you visited?

Mike: Oh, you know, I’ve never given that number any thought because I don’t think I could come up with a reasonable answer. I was doing this since 1978. I started the Pennsylvania road pieces.

I came into the office one day and the news director said we want you to go out and do this thing called On the Pennsylvania Road. And I said, okay, but what is it I’m supposed to do? He said, “Well, we don’t know for sure because it’s a new thing but we want you to do it three times a week. So here I am stuck looking for stories and I literally went door-to-door looking for stories that I could tell that would fit the situation.

Joan: Didn’t they give you any guidelines? I mean, they didn’t tell you that you’re going to the Harrisburg area one day and then you’ll be in the Philadelphia area. What was your region or did they just sort of throw you out there?

Mike: That was basically it. It was Northeastern and Central PA, which was our coverage area and it still is although I haven’t checked for a long time. They said you know go out and do your thing and we’ll look for the first story in a couple of weeks. And so that’s what I did. I went out and traveled around from town to town. You know you go to diner somewhere in some town.

Joan: So you just walked into and a diner or wherever – a supermarket.

Mike: And then you just sit around, and you listen and after a while, you get the hang for it. You get an idea of what you’re looking for and which person in that crowd might fit into that story. You kind of zero in on them and listen a little bit and see where they’re going. You can tell if the person has that kind of laid-back personality that you can work with and have some fun with. And if they do something really neat, that’s good, too.

Joan: Was it the opportunity to travel or the opportunity to meet interesting people who told interesting stories that initially interested you?

Mike: I think it was a little bit of both but I think it had more to do with the individuals involved. This is a fascinating world I think and we don’t get a look at most of it. We see what’s on the news.

We look at the politicians and we look at the town officials and so forth, but I’ve always felt that what really drives America, what really makes America tick, Pennsylvania included, are the people who live on the back roads. They’re the people who go to work every day – seven days a week sometimes. They raise their families to the best of their ability. They live to whatever comfort level they can get to in the world and they’re decent people.

If you call them up at two o’clock in the morning and say I’m stuck down in a ditch at the bottom of your hill, well, the guy will come out and he might not like it but he’ll do it and come down and help you pull your vehicle out of whatever mud hole you’ve managed to get it into. Even though it is two o’clock in the morning and he’s got to go to work the next day. I think those are the kinds of people that make America great.

It’s not the people who lead our country, so to speak. It’s the average John Q. Citizen who’s really the backbone of our country and those are the people that I have been privileged to meet. And I say privileged because a lot of them were really one and done. You know I’d go in and meet them and talk to them and be fascinated by their abilities and their travels and their attitudes and their personalities. Then I’d move on to the next individual who kind of fit the same mold. I was privileged to meet individuals who would open up about what they did and we would sit and just shoot the breeze. That’s what we did. No interview per se, we’d just sit and talk and I’d tell the guy or girl forget the camera. He (the camera-man) is not here. He doesn’t work with me anymore. They would take sometimes two or three minutes to get into the interview but eventually, they’d forget the photographer behind me and we would just sit and shoot the breeze. In there somewhere is the nut of the story.

Joan: What did you typically interview about? Was it anything that came into your mind at the moment or was there a purpose to the interviews? Was there always a reason?

Mike: No, other than the fact that you generally needed the interview but you didn’t need the whole interview. You needed three or four seconds here and 10 to 15 seconds there. That’s what you needed. And when we got them both a photographer and I knew that we were done. It wasn’t going to get any better than that. We had this guy locked in. His sound was in there. So let’s just say the individual was doing something to I don’t want to write, you know get that miscarried but

If the individual were doing something, we would then go and have them do it. And then they might say something while we’re shooting the story. But if they didn’t that was alright, too. Most of them would forget that the camera was there and they would just shoot the breeze. And so would I. We would talk about this and talk about that and in there somewhere is another sound bite that you know is going to fit. And after you’ve done this for several years you kind of get the idea.

That’s how we set up a story. There were very few times that we actually did an interview like we’re doing here – one-on-one. It was more like well, let’s sit down and talk and let’s see if something happens…

Joan: And you knew, right then, the direction you were going?

Mike: Yeah, we knew the guy or girl did something. We knew people who did crocheting and you know painting and all kinds of things.

Joan: So would you call yourself a traveling journalist?

Mike: Well, it’s a good title and I like that title. I’ve never used the title before but I guess so. I would go into a town and we’d record individuals and essentially make it into a journal. Although we called it “On the Pennsylvania Road,” it was really a journal of everyday life with individuals who had some unique talent. And some didn’t have a unique talent. Some were just fun to be with.

The very first story we did was a guy who told me he could forecast the weather by the number of times a cricket chirped per minute. So we sat on his front porch and those were the days when we were shooting film and the film was very expensive. I mean, relatively speaking. So the photographer is loaded up, and he’s rolling, and I said how do you do this weather forecasting thing? It was a dumb, dumb question. I never should have asked it. He said, well, I just count the chirps of the cricket.

He said, for example, there’s one underneath the porch that’s chirped 14 times in the last minute. He said, watch, he’ll do it again. Let’s listen. So we’re sitting there while the photographer’s running through the film, at some unimaginable rate and my whole life is passing before me. The guy says at the end of a minute, okay, that cricket chirped 14 times in the last minute. Now, how he knew that I don’t know because, in the summertime, there were a thousand crickets underneath the porch, but I said to the guy, so what does that mean? What do you get out of that? And he said well, it’s going to rain tomorrow night. And I said, well, how do you know that? He said well, I don’t know for sure but it’s happened often enough Gotta be some truth to it. He was just a fun guy to be with and that’s the way that very first story kind of set the groundwork for all the other stories that came after. It was whatever suited our fancy. Whatever I found that I thought was interesting and those are the kinds of people I’ve dealt with throughout my career.

Joan: What are a few of the places you visited that you would recommend to people – since this is about travel and you’ve obviously been to a lot of different towns and cities? Where would you recommend travelers go to find Pennsylvania at its finest?

Mike: New Hope…That’s a good spot. There’s a lot of arts and crafts and there are a lot of good people who do their thing every day. I like Sullivan County for getting around. I like scenic shots. I do some photography and Sullivan County has a lot of scenery. You know, Bradford County is a good one. We took one of my favorite drives, Route 6…

Joan: Yes, we’re definitely going to discuss that (route)…

Mike: Yes, we took that one. You wind up out in Ohio actually, eventually, but you get on the way out there you get to Erie.

Joan: So you really did go a distance. So you really weren’t in only in Northeastern Pennsylvania.

Mike: A lot of Pennsylvania – let me put it that way. We didn’t do the big cities. We never bothered with the big cities because they didn’t attract us. The small towns like the one that has the Jimmy Stewart Museum. I don’t remember the town but there is a Jimmy Stewart Museum. Don’t put me on the spot.

Joan: I know you’ve been to a lot of places and it’s obviously difficult to remember (all the places you’ve been).

Mike: I must tell you this though that we found all these stories by simply researching it. So if you really want to see what Pennsylvania is like you can do the research and the materials are out there. There’s the Zippo lighter company out in Bradford, (County). It’s a very interesting company.

Joan: I’ve never heard of the Zippo Factory. So this is great. I’m learning a lot.

Mike: Yeah, they make the Zippo lighters. You may not be familiar with them, but they had a closed top.

Joan: I remember you flipped them.

Mike: There was a little wheel on it with a flint and that was long before the Bic lighters came along. But yeah, they made them out there and they made the commemorative cigarette lighters. And there was a museum that you could tour and go around and see what they had and learn how long they had been around.

Up in that area, too, there’s oil a lot of oil exploration, which is another part of history. But again, these are all things that we found just by looking. The Slinky Factory…

Joan: That one I’ve heard of.

Mike: Yeah, and an interesting place with a lot of history there. I think that’s what drew us to these things, too, because they had such a great background and everybody could relate to them. See, you know, Slinky.

Joan: Yes.

Mike: You know the Zippo lighter.

Joan: Now I do.

Mike: But those were all things that are in Pennsylvania. You know, and they’re all out there. All you have to do is look for them and then go visit them. That’s where we were coming from.

Joan: Many people travel for business purposes. Yours is sort of a mix of business and you also enjoyed it. It was really a mix of… and some obviously do it for leisure vacations. Breaking out of our region, and staying in the region and learning everything Pennsylvania offers is obviously beneficial. What would you say are some of the benefits of taking a journey into unknown territory or uncharted territory?

Mike: Because there is always a surprise at the end. It may not be the kind of surprise that you want. But there will be a surprise of some kind.

Joan: And excuse me for one minute. I don’t mean only in our state. I’m talking about regionally and nationally. What are the benefits of doing that – of breaking out?

Mike: Oh, yeah, I agree with it a hundred percent. There are a lot of things you can learn about an area. Let’s say Pennsylvania. There are a lot of things you can learn about Pennsylvania as I did by doing the research going into the published pieces that come out. But if you go by yourself or with your family, and you take a ride out to I don’t know, Oil City, (for example) and you look around there, there’s no telling what you’re going to find and that surprised us. That’s what made us keep going because the predictable was always there. We knew that. What made it really, really interesting was what you came across and that’s what made the trip intriguing. Now if you have two or three kids, that’s another ballgame.

Joan: That’s another kettle of fish.

Mike: Yeah, you might need to plan a trip differently. But if you’re there with your wife or husband and you’re out traveling around, you’re saying well gee, let’s go down that road for a while. Where does it go? Well, I don’t know, but it looks like it’s going to go someplace. So why don’t we take that road and see what happens?

Joan: I do that, but you know my kids do not enjoy it in the least.

Mike: Well, no, they won’t appreciate it until later on. But with me, that was always our key. When we had time we could do it. We would go on a road somewhere that looked interesting. It looked interesting. So that to me is the best part – the surprise.

Joan: And there always is a surprise. It doesn’t matter where you go.

Mike: No, and again it may be something you don’t like.

Joan: It may not always be a very good surprise.

Mike: No, but it’s going to be the kind of thing that will keep people entertained around the dinner table.

Joan: Yes, (I agree). Give us an overview…give my listeners an overview of some of the areas and what they can expect to find as tourists in Pennsylvania, and also the people who live in the state who may not know as much about it as they should. Give them some ideas of what they’ll find in the different regions.

Mike: Okay. Well to the best of my ability, I’ve forgotten a lot of them. In Williamsport, there’s the Riverboat, of course. South on the Susquehanna (River), and I can’t remember the name of the town but there is a ferry boat that goes across one side to the other. I think it takes two cars, maybe three and their people, and it chugs along out through the Susquehanna from one side to the other. It’s on a map. You’ve got to look for it on the map. The guy who used to be the captain of that, a guy by the name of Jack Dillman, went on to become the captain of a ferry boat down in Harrisburg, which you could also travel on. And while you’re in Harrisburg you should take a look at the state capitol building.

Joan: Yes, that is a splendid architectural (gem).

Mike: An extraordinary accomplishment…Then on the way back up you come up on the easterly side of the Susquehanna because you’ve already seen the Westerly side and you drive up that way to get into Schuylkill County and just a whole bunch of little towns on the way up. I don’t have favorites, per se, because I try not to pick favorites. I think that’s a good thing because it rules everybody else out. But, you know, we travel through a town and you inevitably find something that was amusing or entertaining or just you know, a museum in Pottsville, where they keep cars – old cars. Those kinds of things. And so up in the Northeastern section maple syrup making is starting. Yes. In fact, it’s already started. I tried tracking a guy down the other day in the Moscow area who was making 250 gallons of sap. He had boiled on a Saturday afternoon and I wanted to go up and see that but I couldn’t find him.

Joan: Are you writing articles about this or are you doing any live broadcast work right now? You mentioned the maple syrup. Is this work-related?

Mike: Well, it’s kind of a mix. I’m trying to develop my own little system that I can use my own just for the fun of it and I do some things for 16. As far as a podcast or a blog, you know, it’s all like just fool with it and see if something works. I’ve gotten through life doing that and so you say to yourself, well, gee, maybe that’ll work. Maybe it won’t.

Joan: Much like we’re doing right now.

Mike: Yeah, we’re seeing how this works. We don’t know how it’s going to work. We’re going to sit here and shoot the breeze and talk about things and see how it goes. And that’s basically what I’m doing.

Joan: I would also like my listeners to know that this is not our first interview – that I interviewed you a couple of years ago. We both love to talk. And so this is a great opportunity.

Mike: Well, you were working in newspapers at the time.

Joan: Yes.

Mike: And yes, and that’s another thing that I lament. I must say, you know, there’s a lot of newspapers that have gone bankrupt across the country because of the internet and digital and I really find that to be sad. Now, locally, we’ve got a couple that are still doing okay and I hope that continues. I really do because you don’t find out about the pancake suppers all the time from the big metro papers. You got to go to these little places and find what’s going on in town. That’s where you find it, you know, and for the local newspaper, that’s the treasure. They really are.

Joan: There’s something about opening a book or opening a newspaper and reading it that you don’t get from digital publications. I’m not obviously putting them down but there’s just something (about them). Maybe it’s because we grew up with newspapers that we appreciate them so much, so much more. Well, one of the questions that I want to talk to you about is during our conversation about a week ago, you mentioned a trip you’d like to take. Where would you like to venture? Tell me more about the cross-country trek – what you’d like to see.

Mike: I’d like to do on the Pennsylvania Road in every state where Route 6 travels through. And Route 6, for those of you who are not close to the area, Route 6 goes east to west or west to east depending on how you look at it, but it goes coast to coast.

Joan: Where does it actually begin, if that’s not a ridiculous question? I have no idea where it begins, but I know where it ends.

Mike: Yeah, well it begins in the Atlantic Ocean.

Joan: Ok, so it was sort of a silly question.

Mike: Well, no, because it varies. It used to go coast-to-coast, specifically, but then what I found out is, California changed its highway numbering system several decades ago. And so that kind of cut off Route 6 before it hit the water in California. You can still go that route, per se, but I want to do what I’ve done in Pennsylvania all across the country. I just think when you go on an interstate, you have one intent in mind. That’s to get from point A to point B as fast as humanly possible and that the speed limit…

Joan: And avoid any kind of traffic or jams.

Mike: Yeah, but my goal on traveling Route 6 is to just travel it. The signs are easy to follow. I have a GPS in my vehicle, you know, which will take me from one point to the next and it’s what you find along the way. Charlie Bennett’s old fishing lure store or something.

Joan: Now when you do this, are you going to stop and talk to everyone or talk to certain people? Or is it more of a visual journey? Or do you anticipate you’ll actually do interviews, maybe not for a particular publication, but would you say that you’re going to do interviews or you just want to talk to people?

Mike: It’s a little bit of both. It depends on what actually develops. But again, it’s wanting to see America and not from the view of an interstate, where everything is bypassed at 75 miles an hour or more if you can get away with it.

Joan: Some places, right?

Mike: Yes, but I want to take Route 6 where the speed limit sometimes goes down to 35 miles an hour. Oh my goodness, we’ll never get there. That’s the point. Who cares? You can drive all the way across and if you see something, a covered bridge… There’s one out on Route 6 in Bradford County off to the right-hand side of the road. (It’s a) Beautiful covered bridge. I shot three dozen pictures there one afternoon just for the fun of it. But that’s the kind of stuff you find – the fairgrounds out in Bradford County. If they’re having a fair, you stop at the fair. Say hello. How are you doing? Shoot the breeze for a while and see what happens. Maybe you’ll run across the 800-pound pig or something.

That’s the way to see America in my mind. And that’s my goal. That’s my bucket list goal I think – one of my bucket list things.

Joan: Is to be able to see all of America east to west on Route 6?

Mike: Yes.

Joan: Do you have any idea when you might do this and is your wife ready for this, also?

Mike: Well, she’s kind of on the edge with it but I thought we’d warm up a little bit by going up to the New England coast on Route 6. Just to see what happens.

Joan: Say, “Honey, this is Route 6.”

Mike: Yeah, we’re going to go from here to I don’t know, Butte Montana, on Route 6. I don’t know where we’re going. But I think that to me is something I really want to do.

Joan: Well on that note, it has been an absolute pleasure interviewing you again, and I really appreciate that you’ve joined me at Keystone today. I want to give Keystone a huge thank you for allowing me to do this podcast in their recording studio.

Mike: It’s a nice Studio.

Joan: It is a wonderful studio and very comfortable. Yeah, and so again, thank you.

Mike: You’re welcome.

Joan: Best wishes with your trek across the country.

Mike: Thanks, Joan.

Joan: You’re welcome.

Do you love interviews? Read this interview with digital marketing icon Neil Patel.

My COVID-19 coverage continues indefinitely as a service to my colleagues around the world. Contact me if you’d like to be featured in a future guest post or podcast interview.

Start or join a discussion on my Facebook page.

This podcast recording was transcribed using Wreally Transcribe, an innovative service that has saved me countless hours of transcribing my audio interviews to text. Why not offer your listeners and readers a transcription? You can do so with this service. Click SiteGround, a hosting company that makes customer service a NUMBER ONE priority.

DISCLAIMER:

Some of the links on this website are affiliate links. I will receive a small commission if you choose to buy a product or service via one of these links. Rest assured, I only recommend a product or service I’ve used and feel completely comfortable recommending to you.

No Comments
European Travel Everything, Everywhere Travel Guest Series Guest Travel Stories Guest Travel Writers Ireland travel stories Lifestyle

Take Me Home to Ireland

Carden Family descendants

Tóg Mé Bhaile go Éirinn (Translation)

Paul Kostiak, a native of Scranton, Pennsylvania, is a retired Regulatory Compliance Analyst who now spends his time traveling and writing. As an approved United Nations international expert/lecturer, Paul has extensive experience visiting other countries and experiencing their cultures. He’s co-owner of the Ireland-based “Take Me Home Ireland” tours, a company that provides individualized Ireland tours.

Paul Kostiak takes in the surroundings at Moyne Abbey, County Mayo, a national monument and what’s considered to be one of the most impressive ecclesiastical ruins in Mayo. Photo by Lee Shaffer.

By: Paul Kostiak

The first time I traveled to Ireland I was only mildly excited.

After all, I had flown over a million miles during my professional career, much of it internationally. This was a pleasure trip. A chance to explore the Emerald Isle from which three of my four maternal great grandparents had emigrated.

I had been somewhat of an amateur genealogist for a number of years and this was possibly my first chance to make some interesting discoveries in situ. Little did I know this flight from Newark to Dublin was the first step toward what would become an obsession, with multiple return trips every year. As a genealogist, I would find the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow, and as a person, I would come to fall in love with a country and its people.

Oddly, this would not be my first glimpse of Ireland. I had seen it before from 35,000 feet in the air on a flight from Newark to Amsterdam. Our flight path took us directly over and as I glanced out of the window on a rare clear day, I saw green – nothing but green.

“That has to be Ireland,’ I muttered to myself. A few years later I would be wheels-down on that green.”

Some who know me casually had questioned my interest in Ireland. My Ukrainian surname belies all the Irish blood within me. Tis on me mam’s side. Three of my mother’s grandparents had been born there before emigrating to Northeastern Pennsylvania. Through my cursory genealogical research, I had been able to identify their names and in some cases, their parent’s names as well as their approximate dates of birth.

Carden Family descendants
Carden descendants at the site of Sarah Carden’s birth, Ballyderg, County Mayo
Front – Paul Kostiak Second row – Julie Shaffer Klotz, Ann Kostiak Shaffer Third row – Lee Shaffer, John Boone
Photo by Vicki Kostiak

Some of it was easy. My grandmother, Katie Allen Boone, passed away when my mother was only 10 months old and because of this, she was raised by her Irish grandmother, Mary Mullarkey Allen, and her mother’s sister, Mary. Her other Irish grandmother Sarah Carden Boone lived next door. There is no doubt the Irish raised her. This gave me three Irish lines to explore – Mullarkey, Allen, and Carden.

Discovering great-great grandparent’s David and Margaret Carden grave, Tuam, County Galway
From left, Lee Shaffer and Paul Kostiak. Photo by Tony Traglia

Armed with this limited information, I had a glimmer of hope that I might be fortunate enough to find just a wee bit more about them, but that was a secondary purpose. My primary purpose was even more personal. As a gift to my mother, I was taking her along for the ride to the homeland of those incredibly strong Irish women who had formed her into the strong woman she is. At 85-years-old, she, who had never ventured farther from Avoca, Pennsylvania than the Jersey shore, would board her first airplane and soar across the pond. My sister, Ann, accompanied and her son, Lee, who had been there several times before and would act as our guide. We were taking Grandma on one helluva road trip.

Gloria Kostiak’s first plane trip. Front to back – Ann Kostiak Shaffer, Gloria Kostiak, and Lee Shaffer

We touched down in Dublin early in the morning after flying all night on the red-eye. After collecting our bags and navigating my newly minted world traveler mother through immigration and customs, we waited outside for the car hire shuttle. As she stood in the early morning sunrise, she looked up and saw the tri-color green, white and orange flag gently waving in the breeze.

I heard her repeating, more to herself than anyone, “I can’t believe I’m here.”

If you’ve ever been to Ireland you’ll know what an adventure just maneuvering can be. Driving on the left side of the road from the right side of the car (and automatic transmissions are virtually unheard of), negotiating your way through the seemingly endless roundabouts, all while deciphering road signs written in both English and Irish Gaelic, can be somewhat intimidating. Best leave the driving to Nephew Lee who’s had experience, as my own was limited to riding left-sided shotgun in Japan.

Our plan was to experience the entire island, which is about the size of Indiana, in seven days. We would travel from Dublin, down the east coast across the south, up the west coast to the north, and then back to Dublin for the flight home. A tad ambitious, especially while traveling with an octogenarian, but certainly doable.

Avoca Mill Ireland Paul Kostiak Ireland travel story
Avoca Mill, County Wicklow
Avoca Mills produces the bulk of Irish wool and is the oldest continually operating business in Ireland.

We spent the first day exploring Dublin, Ireland’s capital, and largest city. While there is a lot of Irish culture, it is a large city and filled with the typical tourist destinations, Trinity College and St. James Gate where Guinness is brewed. We spent the night at the four-star Croke Park Hotel, rose the next morning for a “full Irish” breakfast and we were on our way south to see the real Ireland. Our first stop on the list was a small village in County Wicklow called Avoca. I was raised in a similar small town in Avoca, Pennsylvania, and Mom, Ann, and Lee still live there. For a true Avocan, no trip to Ireland is complete without a visit to Avoca, County Wicklow, and the world-famous Avoca Mills where the iconic Irish wool is woven into the plaids and tweeds that we all know. Avoca Mills produces the bulk of these fabrics and is the oldest continually operating business in Ireland. Of course, a pop into Fitzgerald’s Pub, the only pub in town, for Mom’s first pint o’ the Black Stuff (Guinness) was mandatory as well.

Next on the itinerary was County Cork, and Cork Town, the second-largest city in Ireland. Of the Irish who emigrated to Northeastern Pennsylvania, beginning during the Great Hunger (mistakenly called the Potato Famine by unknowing Americans), County Cork was home to the second-largest contingent.  Although it’s a rather large city, Cork Town is much more quaint than Dublin with its pristine parks, traditional pubs, and the beautiful River Lee.

We spent the night at the four-star River Lee Hotel and of course, my nephew just had to take a dip in his namesake frigid river before we left. We decided against the obligatory stop at the Blarney Stone in County Cork. The prospect of standing in a long line (queue) of bus riding tourists only to climb rickety wooden stairs, lie on our backs over the edge, and kiss the stone that millions of others have done before seemed rather unappealing. Rumor has it, the local lads relieve themselves on (the stone) after the tourists leave.

From Cork, we set out for Mizen Head, the southernmost point in Ireland, and often the last glimpse of Europe passengers aboard transatlantic ships from England would see on their way to America. A “head” in Ireland is what we would call a peninsula. If you were to look at a map of Ireland you’d see a group of these heads jutting out from the southern coast like fingers. The tip of Mizen Head is the southernmost point of all of them. It’s also one of the windiest places I’ve ever been to.

The weather in Ireland is enigmatic. Although it lies farther north than Newfoundland, Canada, the island has a somewhat temperate climate.

“Be prepared to see palm trees, yes, palm trees.”

Ireland has a similar reputation to England, namely rain every day. It may be cloudy most of the time but my experience over multiple trips has been that rain showers are frequent but short-lived and snow is a rare occurrence. It’s not unusual to see umbrella vending machines along the streets. We were there in September so the weather was relatively mild. But nothing could have prepared us for what Mizen Head had to offer.

 I have been in windy conditions before. I’ve spent a fair amount of time in Chicago. I lived in Center City Philadelphia in the winter and am thoroughly familiar with the streets of New York during a storm. I’ve walked snow-covered Gero Mountains in Japan in June and I’ve sailed the open waters of the Rio Plata between Argentina and Uruguay. I’ve lived through countless hurricanes. I’ve never experienced clear weather winds the likes of which we found at Mizen.

The car park at the very tip of Mizen Head is a few hundred yards from the actual tip. To get there entails a long walk on a ground-level wooden boardwalk over the rocky shore. The scenery is breathtaking. The ground can only be described as moonlike and in the distance, the roaring waves of the North Atlantic continually pound the shore. Have I mentioned that the wind was unbearable? The four of us made our way along the boardwalk struggling with each step, being slammed in the face with the North Atlantic wind all the way.

Being the good son that I am, I lagged back with Mom while Ann and Lee paced ahead. Finally, about halfway to the end, Mom had had enough. She turned to me and asked if she could go back to the car. I was never so relieved to grant her a wish as I was then. We retreated to the warmth of the car and waited for the other two to tell us how “awesome” it was.

And so it was time to start heading north toward Galway for our next overnight stay. Along the way, we passed through County Clare, home to the famous Cliffs of Moher. But first, we had to traverse the narrowest country roads that exist on Earth. Bushes along either side of the roads were literally brushing against the side view mirrors. Occasionally we would drive over a knoll only to be confronted by an oncoming farmer’s tractor or a herd of sheep.

“They’re not walking on our road. We’re driving through their field.”

An Unspoken Irish Rule

After roughly fifty miles of this, we finally reached a paved road and eventually the motorway.

Our intention was to visit the Cliffs of Moher but the fog was rolling in from the west coast by the time we got to County Clare and visibility was most assuredly minimal. The wind had abated somewhat but after our experience at Mizen Head, we decided to forgo that stop. As it turns out the Cliffs are an extremely popular tourist destination. Long queues of tourists once again. Much better and less “touristy” cliffs lie ahead, Lee assured us.

Like many counties of Ireland, the largest city is often named the same – County Galway and Galway Town. Along the west coast, the cities are actually a cross between a city and the countless small villages you’ll pass through. We settled in for the night at the Imperial Hotel in the middle of Galway Town. It was somewhat older than other hotels where we had been staying but quite comfortable nonetheless. It was here that I finally had some time to myself to relax and also where I enjoyed one of the most Irish experiences of my short time there and since.

After the long day of travel, the others were beginning to succumb to jet lag. Because I spent the majority of my career traveling I am somewhat immune to it. And so, when in Ireland do as the Irish do. I hit the hotel pub.

It was late afternoon, around half five as they say, and so I was the only customer there. The barmaid was a lovely lass appropriately named Colleen who was thankfully blessed with the Irish gift of gab. We discussed my family ties to Ireland, which tourist sites to avoid, Gaelic sports (that’s a story for another time), all while she continued to politely ask if I fancied another pint o’ the Black. Sure, it was quite the craic. (The craic – pronounced crack – is the Irish way of saying fun or a good time).

Eventually, her shift relief walked behind the bar. He was a young man. Very young. He looked to be 12-years-old. I knew the legal drinking age in Ireland is 18 but this barman seemed to be more of a barboy. His name is Danny King. I only mention this because one of my favorite bartenders here at home is a fine Irish-American lad named Danny King.  As it turned out this was young Danny’s first night behind the bar and it fell to the lovely Colleen to train him.

Kostiak and his family found Danny King learning to bar tend.
Barman, Danny King, first night behind the bar, and Ann Shaffer, Galway

Pouring a proper Guinness is both a science and an art and must be done correctly to avoid the wrath of the customers. First, it must absolutely be served in a genuine Guinness pint glass. They take this seriously. These glasses have a CE mark on them which indicates that they have been certified for use within the European Union and that they hold exactly 16 ounces. In America, a “pint” glass is actually 14 ounces. Contrary to popular belief the Irish do NOT drink their beer warm. That’s the British. Cold temperature is monitored as closely as the volume of the glasses. Also. there is a distinct difference in taste between the Guinness we get in America and what you’ll find in Ireland even though it’s all brewed in Dublin. It doesn’t “travel well” I’m told. The proper pouring technique is to tip the glass to a 45-degree angle and pour until the glass is precisely three-quarters filled. Then it’s set down to rest for a few minutes. Guinness is not carbonated as most beers are, nitrogen is used to create the head and create its distinct creamy texture – think chocolate milk. Because of this, foam accumulates but eventually settles down. Once it has settled the glass is filled and served. Not before. To do so is a mortal sin I would imagine punishable by the ire of the whole of Ireland.

Back to young Danny. Yer man (boy?) was struggling to acquire the skill of a proper Irish barman. With each pour, the overseeing eye of Colleen gently critiqued him and promptly passed his mistakes onto me, the only soul at the bar – on the house. Quite the craic indeed. Eventually, young Danny triumphed and was able to pour the perfect Guinness and alas my stint as Guinness Quality Control inspector came to an end.

Belleek Castle, Ballina County Mayo
Belleek Castle, Ballina County Mayo

The next morning we left on the final leg of our tour. We were headed to County Mayo and the lovely town of Ballina. I mentioned earlier that Cork was the home of the second-largest contingent of Irish immigrants in Northeastern Pennsylvania. The Province of Connacht is by far the largest contributor, 85 percent by some estimates.

The Republic of Ireland is composed of four provinces, Connacht, Munster, Leinster, and Ulster. The three southern provinces include 25 of the 26 counties of the Republic while Ulster consists of the 26th Republican county (County Donegal) as well as the six counties of Northern Ireland. Provinces were originally small kingdoms and today they don’t really have any significance other than a geographic description, much like we might say of New England and its six states. The Province of Connacht includes the counties Galway, Mayo, Sligo, Leitrim, and Roscommon and is located in the northwest corner of the Republic. Our visit took us to Mayo, where Lee had made friends during his previous trips.

The largest city in County Mayo is Ballina, whose population is slightly more than 10,000. Interestingly, Ballina is Sister Cities with Scranton, Pennsylvania, a testament to the large number of Irish-Americans in Northeastern Pennsylvania who can trace their roots to County Mayo. We would spend three days there to give us time to meet and socialize with Lee’s friends and explore the county, in my opinion, the most beautiful in Ireland.

Scranton Tree is found in Ballina, County Mayo, Ireland, a Scranton, Pennsylvania, U.S.A. sister-city.
The Scranton Tree, County Mayo, Ireland, symbolizes the large number of Northeastern Pennsylvania Irish-Americans who can trace their roots to County Mayo.

For our stay, we selected the Great National Hotel, another very comfortable and clean accommodation.

Ballina is the sort of town that instantly makes you feel comfortable, much more than any of the other towns we visited. Even before I had met any friends there was something about it that made me feel at home. Lee told me that he felt the same the first time he visited. We would later find out the reason why.

The beautiful River Moy winds its way through the center of Ballina northward to Killala Bay on the Atlantic. It is known as the Salmon Capital of Ireland, and on any given day fly fishermen and women can be seen plying their skills in hopes of landing the evening’s dinner. Visitors can try their hand at it or enjoy it in one of the many fine restaurants in town. Just one of many reasons to visit.

Like any respectable Irish town, Ballina is not without its share of pubs. Each one is as welcoming as the others. On any given night the craic is bursting the walls in each one, complete with live traditional Irish music and plenty of adult beverages flowing from the taps. It’s a given that one of the locals will strike up a conversation with you, especially when they hear our accent. You’ll be engaged in hours of long conversation.

“There are no strangers in Ireland, only friends you haven’t met.”

An Irish Adage

At the risk of slighting all of the other pubs, I’ll have to pick one as my personal favorite.

 “An Aulde Shebeen is one of a kind. The name means The Old Shebeen.”

A shebeen (she-BEAN) is what we might call a speakeasy. Under British rule, there was a set of laws called the Penal Laws which restricted the rights of Catholics. Among other things, Catholics were forbidden to gather together or to drink alcohol and have the craic. As a result, they came up with their own version of still made grain moonshine called poitín (po-CHEEN). They would secretly come together in an inconspicuous place, usually, someone’s home, to drink. Such places were called shebeens.  In today’s pubs the restrictions obviously no longer apply, but The Shebeen carries on the spirit of the day.

Scranton Tree in County Mayo Ireland honors its sister city - Scranton Pennsylvania.
The tree marker in County Mayo, Ireland, bears the names of former Scranton mayors, Jimmy Connors and Chris Doherty. The Scranton Tree represents a kinship between the two cities.

Ballina is also home to the Cathedral of St. Muredach (MOOR-a-dock), the seat of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Killala. I mention this only because of its historical significance. Muredach was a follower of St. Patrick himself in the early sixth century and Patrick instructed him to establish a church in nearby Killala, with Muredach as its first bishop. Remains of the old cathedral can still be seen adjacent to the present cathedral. A well still exists in Killala where it is said that St. Patrick himself baptized his converts of the area.

Continuing on the religious theme, a short 30-minute car ride from Ballina is the Shrine of Our Lady of Knock. Catholic tradition holds that in 1879 several peasant farmers and their families witnessed the appearance of the Virgin Mary, St. Joseph, and St. John the Evangelist on the site of the shrine. Today the Shrine of our Lady of Knock takes its place among the shortlist of apparition sites which includes Lourdes, Fatima, and Guadalupe. The site has been visited by five popes as well as St. Mother Teresa and is visited by hundreds of thousands of faithful pilgrims each year. Of course, we had to get Mom there to attend Mass, purchase rosaries, and have them blessed with holy water from the shrine. This holy place is memorialized in the beautiful Irish song Lady of Knock.

Within a short five minute drive, you’ll find the beautiful Belleek Forest as well as Belleek Castle. The castle is an early 19th-century replacement for a 13th-century one built on the banks of the River Moy. Although we haven’t stayed overnight there (yet!!) the castle functions as an operating hotel. Its Library Restaurant was where we enjoyed a fine dining meal to mark our last evening in Mayo before heading home.

“Mom’s review? “I feel like a queen!”

Another nearby attraction we had a difficult time tearing Mom away from is the Foxford Woolen Mills – a shopper’s dream. They offer the beautiful Irish woolen goods such as flat caps, scarves, and the iconic woolen Aran sweaters. Fortunately for Mom, they offer to ship her purchases back home so she didn’t have to haul her entire Christmas gift cache on the plane with her.

Mayo is also the location of many fascinating geologic and archeologic sites which were must-dos on our list. In less than an hour, you can be at Downpatrick Head. This amazing place is a geological wonder with its rolling green hills, amazing cliffs. Yes, much more awe-inspiring than the Cliffs of Moher as Lee had promised. The indescribable Dún Briste sea stack ( dun=fort, briste=broken, think our Dun-more), is a 150-foot high piece of the cliffs that broke away from the mainland 350 million years ago. St. Patrick also established a church here and some of the remains can still be seen.

Dun Briste in Ireland
The Dún Briste sea stack and the cliffs were formed in the Lower Carboniferous period, a geological term that refers to a time 350 million years ago when the sea temperatures in and around Ireland were much higher than today.

Next on our list was another magical place. Ten minutes from Downpatrick Head we found Céide Fields (KY-duh meaning “flat-topped hill”). This Neolithic site is the oldest known agricultural field system in the world, dating back to 3500 BC, older than the pyramids of Egypt. The museum and the walking tour were followed up by afternoon tea in the café which certainly put a smile on Mom’s face.

 As you might have guessed Mayo is steeped in religious history. Centuries-old ruins of religious abbeys litter the landscape and it is one of these, in particular, that lead me to make a significant genealogical discovery and the spark which united my urge to return again and again. While exploring the ruins of nearby Moyne Abbey, I noticed an old stone plaque on the wall. The abbey was constructed in 1460, almost 40 years before Columbus sailed from Spain to the New World. On this plaque, I was barely able to make out the name “Carden.” If you recall my great grandmother’s maiden name was Sarah Carden. I immediately wondered if there were a connection and became determined to find out.

I really didn’t have an idea where my recent ancestors came from in Ireland. I knew that most likely they came from Connacht as this is where the majority of the NEPA Irish had come from. But I had no information to support it. That would soon change immensely.

“I wondered if that was the reason I felt so at home in that particular corner of the beautiful island of Erin. Is there something in my DNA that draws me back?”

As our time in Mayo drew to a close during the drive to Dublin for our flight home, I was already planning my return. I’ve since learned that’s not an uncommon phenomenon. Our mission this time had been completed, we had given Mom the opportunity to walk on the auld sod where her grandmothers and grandfathers did. She prayed on her Knock rosaries on the flight home and I couldn’t help but wonder if she wasn’t saying a prayer for them.

That initial visit with Mom was just the beginning of what became a passionate obsession.

“I became more determined than ever to put faces and places to our family story. I began what still would today remain several true friendships.”

One in particular, is my dear friend Brendan Farrell. Lee met Brendan on his first trip a few years before and he introduced me to him. Brendan, born in Killala and now living with his lovely family in Ballina, became my tour guide, historian, folklorist, a supporter of my geneaology (he’s a wealth of local knowledge) and friend. A singer/songwriter of original Irish music, he also introduced me to Gaelic sports! We eventually became business partners in a custom-designed small tour company, Take Me Home Ireland tours, so named because we both share the same idea that no matter where we are born, we are born with Ireland in our hearts.

Take me home to Ireland also mentioned Scranton PA, a County Mayo sister-city known for its annual St. Patrick's Day parade
Take Me Home to Ireland offers plenty of stories but Paul Kostiak and Brendon Farrell also celebrated Irish culture in Scranton, PA, U.S.A. at the city’s celebrated annual St. Patrick’s Day Parade.

When Brendan wrote his original stage show of storytelling and his rich Irish music “Take Me Home Colleen,” (sensing a theme here?) he trusted me to produce his American premiere at The Theater at North in Scranton. The story of a 19th-century Irish man who left his beloved Colleen back in Ireland while he traveled to NEPA to seek his future. One of his original songs in the show is “Scranton Railroad Lines,” a nod to his friends back here. Most importantly he is the first one to give us a hug and say, “Welcome home,” whenever we return. Such is the value of friendships. There are no strangers in Ireland, only friends you haven’t met.

Kostiak and Lee Paul and Lee discuss the next trip while taking in the beauty. Phot credit - Ann Shaffer
Paul Kostiak and Lee Shaffer plan their next Ireland trip while taking in Ireland’s lush greenery. Photo by Ann Shaffer

That first trip turned into many, on average twice a year. On subsequent trips, we have been able to establish that indeed we hail from Mayo. It must be in the DNA after all. With the help of the North Mayo Family Heritage Centre’s resident professional genealogist, we have greatly expanded our Irish family tree to more generations. On one such trip, I was able to find the remains of the simple stone cottage where Sarah Carden was born and the well in the middle of the field where her father, my great-great-grandfather worked as a shepherd, in which Sarah was likely baptized. We also found the remains of the church where my great-great-grandparents were married, and the grave in County Galway where they rest today. This past September I was able to take Ann, Lee, Ann’s daughter Julie and another great-great-grandson, my cousin John Boone, to these sacred sites.

Unfortunately, Mom was unable to make that trip due to some temporary health issues. I was heartbroken that she wasn’t able to make it. I wanted her to be able to walk in the very footsteps they did and to say a prayer over the grave of those who had the courage to put their eldest daughter on a ship to the new world in 1872. A daughter who would come to raise my Mom.

As a postscript, Mom’s health steadily improved we made a plan to take her in her 89th year to those sacred sites in May 2020. But Nature has a way of changing things. With the help of God, we’ll all get through this pandemic that affects the whole world, including our beloved County Mayo. Until then we can only hope that one day soon we’ll again be on a plane across the pond saying, Tóg Mé Bhaile go Éirinn – Take Me Home to Ireland.

You can reach out to Paul on Facebook at Take Me Home – Irish VIP Tours or via email.

Do you love stories about travel and culture? Did you enjoy Take Me Home to Ireland? Start a discussion or join in with one on my Facebook page.

Read a companion story about Neil Patel’s idea of the perfect getaway.

The Everything, Everywhere, Travel Guest Series is a gift to the world community as we struggle to find “normal” and “familiar” in our lives. Our travel stories allow my guest travel writers and readers to stay focused on the future and remember the past moments that made us smile. As we shelter-in-place and wait for the green light to resume our lives, these stories will prey on your optimism. Contact me if you’d like to share your story.

No Comments

SHOW NOTES

Everything, Everywhere, Travel Guest Podcast Show Notes

Everything, Everywhere, Travel Writer Podcast 

Podcast Show Notes 

Date: April 15, 2020

Episode: 1

Title: Neil Patel Travel Story

Subtitle: The Perfect Getaway

Final Show Link: 


In this episode of the Everything, Everywhere, Travel Writer, Neil Patel, digital marketing icon and entrepreneur, describes how work is always a part of his life and travel for work related-purposes is essential to his business. 

Does Neil allow time from his hectic schedule to relax? 

Yes, but if he doesn’t work, he’s not able to relax. 

Business trips take him to random places like Indonesia or oftentimes, Europe — Germany, London or Paris. Depending on where he’s going, his family joins him and they try to include family activities on top of work. 

What’s his idea of the perfect getaway? You’ll be surprised by his answer so tune in to the show to get the details.  

How does he deal with spending so much time on the road? Find out what he does in his free time.

He reveals his favorite place to relax after days and weeks of business travel. It’s typically not the exotic location you might expect. 

How has travel affected his life? Neil fills us in with details about what he’s learned while “on the go” for business? 

What are some of his favorite places? New York City is one of the United States destinations he loves but he has traveled extensively around the globe. 

What is one travel tip or advice he gives my listeners? Neil gives travel tips to encourage you to get the most of your trip while avoiding the “touristy type” sights. 

A heartfelt thanks to Neil for his time and interest in the Everything, Everywhere, Travel Guest series. He’s a gracious and patient person who loves to teach and share his knowledge. We recorded our podcast more than two months ago and in the meantime, after COVID-19 wreaked havoc, we ran into production, editing and sound quality issues that were somewhat resolved. Please be patient with us as moving forward is a constant work in progress.

Prefer to read a full transcript of his podcast, click here.  

Visit Neil’s website to learn more about the digital marketing services he offers.

We’d love to hear from all our listeners. Please visit our Contact Page and let us know how we can help you today!

Follow our Podcast

Podcasts air every Wednesday. Check back next week for our second episode with a celebrity broadcast journalist who shares his stories from the road.

Join the Conversation

Our favorite part of recording a live podcast each week is participating in the great conversations that happen on our live chat, on social media, and in our comments section.  Join in or start your own conversation about the podcasts on our Facebook page.

This week’s question is:

Where can you find marketing advice during troubled times? 

Explore these Resources

In this episode, we mentioned the following resources:

Check Out More Digital Programming to help you learn and grow as a travel writer and journalist.


Need a Presenter?

  • Earning five newspaper association awards and navigating through more than four decades in the journalism world has taught me countless lessons. Sharing my knowledge with budding journalists through a variety of “channels” is my way of bridging the gap. Contact me to learn more about my services that range from small group coaching to workshops.
Show Notes Page Sponsor a Travel Podcast at joanmatsuitravelwriter.com
Show your support! Sponsor an Everything, Everywhere, Travel Guest Post and Podcast

Voice over by Yoshi Matsui.

Looking for a lesson to get you started, check out one of my courses.

No Comments

new pg

Travel the World Here
We promote all-things-travel with an educational component that helps travelers learn more about destinations and cultures around the world. Our guest travel writer series and podcasts feature stories from our friends near and far. Leave a comment if you have a story to tell about a pivotal travel experience or let us know your thoughts about a story you've read here.
Join Membership
Discover Exciting Destinations
We support and promote "All Things Travel."  Learn more about travel destinations around the world in our blog and weekly podcast. Brush up on your travel writing and journalism skills with  our courses. Get one-on-one support in our membership group and travel writer coaching platform.  Read product and book reviews. Find up-to-date travel and tourism industry news.   Love to fly fish? Read the latest news from the fly-fishing world.  It's all here at joanmatsuitravelwriter.com.  Scroll down to learn more.  Photo of Expo 2020 Dubai  Al Wasl Dome provided courtesy of Dubai Tourism. Learn more about this world-event.
Join Membership
Get Your Travel News
We support and promote "All Things Travel."  Learn more about travel destinations around the world in our blog and weekly podcast. Brush up on your travel writing and journalism skills with  our courses. Get one-on-one support in our membership group and travel writer coaching platform.  Read product and book reviews. Find up-to-date travel and tourism industry news.   Love to fly fish? Read the latest news from the fly-fishing world.  It's all here at joanmatsuitravelwriter.com.  Scroll down to learn more.  Photo of Expo 2020 Dubai  Al Wasl Dome provided courtesy of Dubai Tourism. Learn more about this world-event. Photos of Gazelles by Debashish Dutta.
Join Membership
Learn Travel Writing
We support and promote "All Things Travel."  Learn more about travel destinations around the world in our blog and weekly podcast. Brush up on your travel writing and journalism skills with  our courses. Get one-on-one support in our membership group and travel writer coaching platform.  Read product and book reviews. Find up-to-date travel and tourism industry news.   Love to fly fish? Read the latest news from the fly-fishing world.  It's all here at joanmatsuitravelwriter.com.  Scroll down to learn more.  Photo of Expo 2020 Dubai  Al Wasl Dome provided courtesy of Dubai Tourism. Learn more about this world-event.
Join Membership

Learn and Explore

Everything, Everywhere, Travel Writer Podcast
Meet my podcast guests here every week. Prefer to read a post? You can view the transcribed stories here.

PODCAST

Check out our first podcast with digital marketing icon, Neil Patel.  Don’t miss this episode as Neil describes his idea of the perfect getaway and travel tips. You can read a full transcript of the Neil Patel interview here. Click on this link to read the show notes. 

You’ll love all of our guests. Stop by every Wednesday to hear celebrities and travelers from around the world share their stories during our insightful interviews. 

The New York Times Travel Show 2020 with Toru Masaki, Mountain Priest Teturyu and Japan tourism advisor
Read the latest news about travel, recreation, and entertainment and follow me on my assignments. I'm shown here with Toru Masaki at The New York Times Travel Show.

Blog

Get the latest travel industry news and promotions, dive into in-depth interviews with extraordinary individuals about everything travel-related, a product showcase, and reviews.  

When I launched joanmatsuitravelwriter.com five years ago, I focused primarily on lodging but soon learned I could incorporate my journalism experience into travel writing and cover a wide variety of topics from lodging to fly fishing. Find my latest blog post here. 

Travel Writer Support Group

Breaking into the world of travel writing can be daunting. We teach you how to create compelling, creative, and engaging content for print and digital media. Each week you’ll receive writing prompts and story creation ideas, editing tips, and the answers to your questions. 

$49 monthly fee

JOIN TODAY!
 
 

Travel Writing Courses

Learn to Interview” and “How to Plan Your Solo Media Trip” 

I lead you through the fundamentals of journalism and travel writing. It’s not enough to write about your travels. You need to learn and practice the essential skills in order to be a dynamic travel journalist. I don’t create a ton of courses. I focus on the fundamental skills you need. Nothing can take the place of knowledge, practice, and perseverance when you want to get from Point A to Point B.   Grab a copy today! 

TRAVEL WITH ME VIDEO PRODUCTIONS BY JOAN MEAD-MATSUI TRAVEL WRITER

Video

Thanks to Wondershare Filmora, I’m able to create videos for my travel clients featuring  the fun I have on my travel assignments. Learning to format videos gave birth to my Joan Matsui Travel Writer YouTube channel. 

Contact me for more information about how you can highlight your business. 

Meet Our Partners: Links You'll Love!

Web Hosting at it’s finest! I had so many issues with my first web host: slow connectivity, frequent malware attacks, and poor customer support. That changed when I moved my three websites to SiteGround. Make your blogging dreams come true with this incredible web-hosting company. 

Get the latest fashion sunglasses that won’t break the bank. sunglasswarehouse sells affordable styles to fit your every mood. I wear their brands for everything from fly fishing to date nights. They offer top-notch customer service, fast shipping, and great prices. Order your sunglasses today! 

Travel the World with Qatar Airways, awarded Airline of the Year (2019) World’s Best Business Class Seat, and Best Airline in the Middle East. This link will take you directly to Qatar’s website so you can book the trip of your dreams

The Content Creators Planner is a tool you can’t live without if you’re a blogger and digital marketer. Take a 90-day challenge to set your business plan in motion. The planner features space to plan your social media posts, email blasts, and overall marketing campaigns. Read my review.  Order your planner here

Shop for The New York Times branded gifts and apparel while you stay on top of national and international news. Give a gift or order something for yourself. 

How much time do you spend transcribing interviews? Transcriptions take time — hours. Transcribe allows you to automatically transform your audio into text. You can subscribe by clicking on the Transcribe image below. 

Orvis caters to customers who love the outdoors. It’s not a surprise why Orvis is the oldest mail-order company and the go-to  online source for outdoor apparel, pet supplies, and fly fishing equipment. Shop for spring activities or check out the clearance items. 

Get outdoors and experience nature! 

Free Tool Area

A Tool You'll Find

Review and News

PRODUCT REVIEWS

Get honest reviews about travel and lifestyle-related products I’ve tried or currently use. 

BOOK REVIEWS

If you travel for business or pleasure, chances are you’ll want to spend your downtime reading. Find your next favorite book here.  

FLY-FISHING, PHOTOGRAPHY, AND OTHER RESOURCES

You’ll find a little of this and that here. 

Salmon Fly-Fishing Tales" Learning to Fly Fish for Salmon on the Salmon River

Latest Blog Posts

Latest Podcast

Everything, Everywhere, Travel Guest Series

TRAVEL BYTES

Historic architecture around the world awaits you. Once we’re able to travel again, let your favorite business owners know how much you’ve missed them.  

Shown is the renovated City Hall Grand Hotel in Williamsport, PA. 

Want to have your image featured here? 

Message me for more information. 

Ask a question about our services!

No Comments

Subscribe to our newsletter

You have successfully subscribed to the newsletter

There was an error while trying to send your request. Please try again.

Joan Mead-Matsui will use the information you provide on this form to be in touch with you and to provide updates and marketing.