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A Penchant for Travel

Aragon Castle, Taranto, Italy
Everything, Everywhere, Travel Writer Guest Series Marcella Nardi

Italian Author, Marcella Nardi’s Quest for History and Mystery

Italian writer and traveler, Marcella Nardi, was born in Northern Italy. She currently lives in Seattle, WA. All photos in this Travel Guest interview were submitted by Marcella Nardi.

Above all, Marcella Nardi has a fondness for travel and writing mystery and detective novels. Her novels combine history and mystery into believable and engaging tales.

Similarly, “A Penchant for Travel” is an opportunity for Marcella to highlight her accomplishments while giving essential travel tips every traveler should know before going to Italy.

Marcella was born in Castelfranco Veneto in Northern Italy but she moved to Seattle, WA in 2008 and since then, dedicates herself to teaching Italian, technical translations, and writing novels. Travel, ancient and medieval history, and photography, reading, and construction of historical models are a few of her interests. She also has a Master’s Degree in computer science.

As a lover of detective novels and the middle ages, Marcella won third prize in the 2011 contest “Philobiblon–Premio Letterario Italia Medievale” (Philobiblon–Medieval Italy, literary award). The winning story was one of the six stories that gave birth to her first book, an anthology, “Grata Aura & Altri Gialli Medievali.” The first edition is called “Medioevo in Giallo.”

Marcella Nardi: History, Mystery and Travel
Award-winning Italian author, Marcella Nardi, combines history, mystery and travel as the storyline in her books.

In Italian, “Giallo” means two things: the color yellow and thriller. Between the two World Wars, a large Italian publishing company started to sell thrillers in books dressed with a yellow background cover. Since then, Italians use the word Giallo for Thriller. She translated the anthology into English, under the title “DNA Code & Other mysterious tales from the Middle Ages” a year later. In December 2014, Marcella won first prize for a story set in Gradara in the contest, “Italia Mia” (“My Italy”), organized by the Italian “National Association of the Book, Science and Research.”

History, mystery and travel
Readers find tales from many of Italy’s most cherished landmarks and cities.

Marcella continues to write novels, and since 2013, she has written more than 15 novels. In fact, she has created a detective series of six novels in which the detective resembles Marcella, having almost the same name, looks, and personality.

Legal thriller fans should check out “Morte all’Ombra dello Space Needle” (“Death in the Shadow of the Space Needle”), the first novel in Marcella’s new legal thriller series set in Seattle, WA. Her historical mystery novel, “Joshua e la Confraternita dell’Arca,” has been translated into English as “Joshua and the Brotherhood of the Ark,” and a paranormal novel, an erotic romance, and several short stories.

Marcella Nardi Mystery and History books
You can find a full collection of books by Marcella Nardi on Amazon. See the link below.

Although I’ve never met Marcella, travel and Italian heritage and traditions are a common thread we share. We’ve both mingled our traditional Italian values and culture we’ve grown up with and interfaced them with our love for writing, art, and architecture.

Marcella Nardi and her mother
Although separated from her family in Italy, Marcella, left, looks forward to the day when she can visit her mother and homeland again.
Enjoy our Q & A interview.

What is your primary purpose for traveling? What percentage of your travel is business versus leisure?  

My primary purpose for traveling was/is to know this wonderful planet and to know different cultures.

The percentage? It depends on the time in my life. There was a time in which 40 percent of my traveling was for work and the rest for leisure. It was the first seven years of my job career. After that 90 percent was for pleasure. I was on all seven continents, even in the Antarctica Peninsula.

Travel to Antarctica
Marcella has traveled the world but in the coming months, as soon as travel restrictions are lifted, she’ll plot her course to destinations in Australia and Africa. Shown is an image from her Antarctica adventure.

What are the benefits of travel?

I think the benefits are not just relax from months of working, but mostly is that knowing other places and other cultures opens your mind. You learn there are good and bad things in your country as far as in other countries. So your way to judge changes.

How does travel ignite creativity?

Travel ignites a lot of my creativity. This is due to many reasons. You can get ideas for plots, as I am mostly a writer in the last 10 years. Looking at the behavior of other people and what happens there, can be a good idea for a new novel.

Antarctica Adventures
Learning more about world culture is a driving force for this Italian author.

What are a few experiences you’ve encountered while seeing the world that has had a profound impact on your life?

It’s a difficult question. I’ve traveled a lot. I could say that visiting the ancient Egyptian temples made me understand how for every civilization there is a rise and fall. If we don’t understand this important topic, and the reasons,  we are doomed to fail.

Marcella Nardi

How would you describe Italy to someone who has never visited your country’

Italy is considered, worldwide, the best or one of the best countries on the planet. I think that it is right, not because it is my home country but because of its history. All the invasions we had for more than 2000 years, made Italy a unique place. The architecture is different from the rest of Europe and the Romanesque and Gothic styles are different. Our cuisine and the people are different from the other European countries. We are a big mixture of people from the very north of Europe and from the Middle East and from Asia and Africa. So a trip to Italy is something that everybody should do in their own life. 

What to see in Sienna, Italy
Italy offers architecture, food, and history one won’t find in other European countries, according to Marcella.

Coming from Italy, one of the world’s most breathtaking, scenic, cultural, and romantic travel destinations, what are a few of the cities and experiences you believe travelers are missing if they adhere to only the most-visited tourist sites?

I think that the typical touristic destinations are nice, but there is so much more to visit. Umbria region, in my opinion, is one of the most beautiful areas in Italy. Apulia, too. It’s difficult to answer just in a few phrases to this question.

One of the treasured Gubbio landmarks Marcella photographed during her travels.

Why are the Umbria region and Apulia two of the most beautiful areas in Italy? What makes them so enticing to visit?

They are not the best but they are very interesting.

Umbria is similar to Tuscany, but is cheaper to go there and its history is great, too. Many old famous families from Tuscany invaded Umbria in the past. You see small villages on the top of mountains as in Tuscany. And the food is quite unique. They have their own cheese and meat that are fantastic.

Apulia was the greatest and the biggest ancient Spartan Greek colony, outside ancient Greece. Also, they have a particular kind of stone, for building, that makes the centuries, churches and the castles really different. Then, in many places, the dialects are like Greek. The Romanesque style in Apulia is very different from other places in Italy and Europe.

Aragon Castle, Taranto, Italy

When you visit Italy, what’s the first place you visit? What’s on your must-see list?

I go back to Italy every year. The first place I go to is Taranto, Apulia. My mother is still alive and she lives there. I spend two weeks with her and then I select an Italian area that I never saw, before. I reserve a hotel room in the middle of that area and with my rental car, I visit two places every day. I am discovering the beauty of my Country.  

What are your plans or dreams for the days ahead when we can travel again?

There are many other places I want to see on this beautiful planet. One is Australia and the Great Barrier Reef; then I would like to see Spain and Northern Africa. I already was in Egypt, but never in other places in Africa.

You can contact Marcella through her web site, www.marcellanardi.com and her Facebook timeline, https://www.facebook.com/marcella.nardi.5.

Marcella Nardi Italian author Joshua English translation The story of a man who became the Son of God.

My Books:

English (ebook & paperback):

English and Italian:

All my other books are in Italian. Follow the link below to find all of her books, including a new series, a legal thriller located in Seattle (“Morte all’Ombra dello Space Needle” and “L’architetto dei Labirinti”) and an audio book featuring Marcella as narrator. You can find her books on Amazon in a digital (eBook-Kindle) and paperback unless otherwise noted. Please note the books do not appear in chronological sequence

If you found A Penchant for Travel, an Interview with Marcella Nardi of value and you’re looking for more travel stories, read other selections in the digital guest travel series.

Submit a story or podcast idea for consideration here.

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Mike Stevens

Mike Stevens Shooting the Breeze an interview with a multi-talented Pennsylvania Journalist

Shooting the Breeze

Travel Stories from the Road

Mike Stevens and I met a few years ago when I interviewed him for a newspaper feature story I was working on. Our interview at WNEP-TV was an exciting moment for two reasons. I’d watched Mike for years interview interesting people from all walks of life as he did what comes naturally to him. He loves to “shoot the breeze.” He’s also such an unpretentious, easy-going person. The podcast episode was my second interview with Mike Stevens. Scroll down to read the digital version of our podcast episode.

Mike Stevens Shooting the Breeze is an entertaining and enlightening journey into broadcast journalism with Mike Stevens, a well-known Pennsylvania journalist.

Introduction

Joan: My guest today is a fellow journalist whom I admire and respect for many reasons. He’s best known as the host of “On the Pennsylvania Road,” a long-running segment on WNEP-TV. He’s also an author, educator, and storyteller and he also shares my love for interviewing people from all walks of life.

Mike Stevens Shooting the Breeze and Sharing Stories from the Pennsylvania road.

Welcome, Mike Stevens.

INTERVIEW

And thank you for meeting me today a Keystone College. How are you, Mike?

Mike: Well, I’m good. I’m good, Joan. I’m kind of retired and sort of working on different things here and there and you know, it’s fun to get together and shoot the breeze.

Joan: For my listeners who don’t know you I would say you are the ideal person to share your experiences as an itinerant traveler, and that’s what I’d like to do today.

Joan: Also, I’d like you to tell me about your life now and what you’re doing. What are you working on?

Mike: Oh, well, I’m doing a podcast occasionally for “16” and I do a blog so I try to write every week or so when I have the opportunity and something strikes my fancy. and that’s about it. I’m thinking about going for a ride somewhere pretty soon. And that’s about it so far and goofing off most of the time.

Joan: When you were the host of on the road how many towns throughout the state do you estimate you visited?

Mike: Oh, you know, I’ve never given that number any thought because I don’t think I could come up with a reasonable answer. I was doing this since 1978. I started the Pennsylvania road pieces.

I came into the office one day and the news director said we want you to go out and do this thing called On the Pennsylvania Road. And I said, okay, but what is it I’m supposed to do? He said, “Well, we don’t know for sure because it’s a new thing but we want you to do it three times a week. So here I am stuck looking for stories and I literally went door-to-door looking for stories that I could tell that would fit the situation.

Joan: Didn’t they give you any guidelines? I mean, they didn’t tell you that you’re going to the Harrisburg area one day and then you’ll be in the Philadelphia area. What was your region or did they just sort of throw you out there?

Mike: That was basically it. It was Northeastern and Central PA, which was our coverage area and it still is although I haven’t checked for a long time. They said you know go out and do your thing and we’ll look for the first story in a couple of weeks. And so that’s what I did. I went out and traveled around from town to town. You know you go to diner somewhere in some town.

Joan: So you just walked into and a diner or wherever – a supermarket.

Mike: And then you just sit around, and you listen and after a while, you get the hang for it. You get an idea of what you’re looking for and which person in that crowd might fit into that story. You kind of zero in on them and listen a little bit and see where they’re going. You can tell if the person has that kind of laid-back personality that you can work with and have some fun with. And if they do something really neat, that’s good, too.

Joan: Was it the opportunity to travel or the opportunity to meet interesting people who told interesting stories that initially interested you?

Mike: I think it was a little bit of both but I think it had more to do with the individuals involved. This is a fascinating world I think and we don’t get a look at most of it. We see what’s on the news.

We look at the politicians and we look at the town officials and so forth, but I’ve always felt that what really drives America, what really makes America tick, Pennsylvania included, are the people who live on the back roads. They’re the people who go to work every day – seven days a week sometimes. They raise their families to the best of their ability. They live to whatever comfort level they can get to in the world and they’re decent people.

If you call them up at two o’clock in the morning and say I’m stuck down in a ditch at the bottom of your hill, well, the guy will come out and he might not like it but he’ll do it and come down and help you pull your vehicle out of whatever mud hole you’ve managed to get it into. Even though it is two o’clock in the morning and he’s got to go to work the next day. I think those are the kinds of people that make America great.

It’s not the people who lead our country, so to speak. It’s the average John Q. Citizen who’s really the backbone of our country and those are the people that I have been privileged to meet. And I say privileged because a lot of them were really one and done. You know I’d go in and meet them and talk to them and be fascinated by their abilities and their travels and their attitudes and their personalities. Then I’d move on to the next individual who kind of fit the same mold. I was privileged to meet individuals who would open up about what they did and we would sit and just shoot the breeze. That’s what we did. No interview per se, we’d just sit and talk and I’d tell the guy or girl forget the camera. He (the camera-man) is not here. He doesn’t work with me anymore. They would take sometimes two or three minutes to get into the interview but eventually, they’d forget the photographer behind me and we would just sit and shoot the breeze. In there somewhere is the nut of the story.

Joan: What did you typically interview about? Was it anything that came into your mind at the moment or was there a purpose to the interviews? Was there always a reason?

Mike: No, other than the fact that you generally needed the interview but you didn’t need the whole interview. You needed three or four seconds here and 10 to 15 seconds there. That’s what you needed. And when we got them both a photographer and I knew that we were done. It wasn’t going to get any better than that. We had this guy locked in. His sound was in there. So let’s just say the individual was doing something to I don’t want to write, you know get that miscarried but

If the individual were doing something, we would then go and have them do it. And then they might say something while we’re shooting the story. But if they didn’t that was alright, too. Most of them would forget that the camera was there and they would just shoot the breeze. And so would I. We would talk about this and talk about that and in there somewhere is another sound bite that you know is going to fit. And after you’ve done this for several years you kind of get the idea.

That’s how we set up a story. There were very few times that we actually did an interview like we’re doing here – one-on-one. It was more like well, let’s sit down and talk and let’s see if something happens…

Joan: And you knew, right then, the direction you were going?

Mike: Yeah, we knew the guy or girl did something. We knew people who did crocheting and you know painting and all kinds of things.

Joan: So would you call yourself a traveling journalist?

Mike: Well, it’s a good title and I like that title. I’ve never used the title before but I guess so. I would go into a town and we’d record individuals and essentially make it into a journal. Although we called it “On the Pennsylvania Road,” it was really a journal of everyday life with individuals who had some unique talent. And some didn’t have a unique talent. Some were just fun to be with.

The very first story we did was a guy who told me he could forecast the weather by the number of times a cricket chirped per minute. So we sat on his front porch and those were the days when we were shooting film and the film was very expensive. I mean, relatively speaking. So the photographer is loaded up, and he’s rolling, and I said how do you do this weather forecasting thing? It was a dumb, dumb question. I never should have asked it. He said, well, I just count the chirps of the cricket.

He said, for example, there’s one underneath the porch that’s chirped 14 times in the last minute. He said, watch, he’ll do it again. Let’s listen. So we’re sitting there while the photographer’s running through the film, at some unimaginable rate and my whole life is passing before me. The guy says at the end of a minute, okay, that cricket chirped 14 times in the last minute. Now, how he knew that I don’t know because, in the summertime, there were a thousand crickets underneath the porch, but I said to the guy, so what does that mean? What do you get out of that? And he said well, it’s going to rain tomorrow night. And I said, well, how do you know that? He said well, I don’t know for sure but it’s happened often enough Gotta be some truth to it. He was just a fun guy to be with and that’s the way that very first story kind of set the groundwork for all the other stories that came after. It was whatever suited our fancy. Whatever I found that I thought was interesting and those are the kinds of people I’ve dealt with throughout my career.

Joan: What are a few of the places you visited that you would recommend to people – since this is about travel and you’ve obviously been to a lot of different towns and cities? Where would you recommend travelers go to find Pennsylvania at its finest?

Mike: New Hope…That’s a good spot. There’s a lot of arts and crafts and there are a lot of good people who do their thing every day. I like Sullivan County for getting around. I like scenic shots. I do some photography and Sullivan County has a lot of scenery. You know, Bradford County is a good one. We took one of my favorite drives, Route 6…

Joan: Yes, we’re definitely going to discuss that (route)…

Mike: Yes, we took that one. You wind up out in Ohio actually, eventually, but you get on the way out there you get to Erie.

Joan: So you really did go a distance. So you really weren’t in only in Northeastern Pennsylvania.

Mike: A lot of Pennsylvania – let me put it that way. We didn’t do the big cities. We never bothered with the big cities because they didn’t attract us. The small towns like the one that has the Jimmy Stewart Museum. I don’t remember the town but there is a Jimmy Stewart Museum. Don’t put me on the spot.

Joan: I know you’ve been to a lot of places and it’s obviously difficult to remember (all the places you’ve been).

Mike: I must tell you this though that we found all these stories by simply researching it. So if you really want to see what Pennsylvania is like you can do the research and the materials are out there. There’s the Zippo lighter company out in Bradford, (County). It’s a very interesting company.

Joan: I’ve never heard of the Zippo Factory. So this is great. I’m learning a lot.

Mike: Yeah, they make the Zippo lighters. You may not be familiar with them, but they had a closed top.

Joan: I remember you flipped them.

Mike: There was a little wheel on it with a flint and that was long before the Bic lighters came along. But yeah, they made them out there and they made the commemorative cigarette lighters. And there was a museum that you could tour and go around and see what they had and learn how long they had been around.

Up in that area, too, there’s oil a lot of oil exploration, which is another part of history. But again, these are all things that we found just by looking. The Slinky Factory…

Joan: That one I’ve heard of.

Mike: Yeah, and an interesting place with a lot of history there. I think that’s what drew us to these things, too, because they had such a great background and everybody could relate to them. See, you know, Slinky.

Joan: Yes.

Mike: You know the Zippo lighter.

Joan: Now I do.

Mike: But those were all things that are in Pennsylvania. You know, and they’re all out there. All you have to do is look for them and then go visit them. That’s where we were coming from.

Joan: Many people travel for business purposes. Yours is sort of a mix of business and you also enjoyed it. It was really a mix of… and some obviously do it for leisure vacations. Breaking out of our region, and staying in the region and learning everything Pennsylvania offers is obviously beneficial. What would you say are some of the benefits of taking a journey into unknown territory or uncharted territory?

Mike: Because there is always a surprise at the end. It may not be the kind of surprise that you want. But there will be a surprise of some kind.

Joan: And excuse me for one minute. I don’t mean only in our state. I’m talking about regionally and nationally. What are the benefits of doing that – of breaking out?

Mike: Oh, yeah, I agree with it a hundred percent. There are a lot of things you can learn about an area. Let’s say Pennsylvania. There are a lot of things you can learn about Pennsylvania as I did by doing the research going into the published pieces that come out. But if you go by yourself or with your family, and you take a ride out to I don’t know, Oil City, (for example) and you look around there, there’s no telling what you’re going to find and that surprised us. That’s what made us keep going because the predictable was always there. We knew that. What made it really, really interesting was what you came across and that’s what made the trip intriguing. Now if you have two or three kids, that’s another ballgame.

Joan: That’s another kettle of fish.

Mike: Yeah, you might need to plan a trip differently. But if you’re there with your wife or husband and you’re out traveling around, you’re saying well gee, let’s go down that road for a while. Where does it go? Well, I don’t know, but it looks like it’s going to go someplace. So why don’t we take that road and see what happens?

Joan: I do that, but you know my kids do not enjoy it in the least.

Mike: Well, no, they won’t appreciate it until later on. But with me, that was always our key. When we had time we could do it. We would go on a road somewhere that looked interesting. It looked interesting. So that to me is the best part – the surprise.

Joan: And there always is a surprise. It doesn’t matter where you go.

Mike: No, and again it may be something you don’t like.

Joan: It may not always be a very good surprise.

Mike: No, but it’s going to be the kind of thing that will keep people entertained around the dinner table.

Joan: Yes, (I agree). Give us an overview…give my listeners an overview of some of the areas and what they can expect to find as tourists in Pennsylvania, and also the people who live in the state who may not know as much about it as they should. Give them some ideas of what they’ll find in the different regions.

Mike: Okay. Well to the best of my ability, I’ve forgotten a lot of them. In Williamsport, there’s the Riverboat, of course. South on the Susquehanna (River), and I can’t remember the name of the town but there is a ferry boat that goes across one side to the other. I think it takes two cars, maybe three and their people, and it chugs along out through the Susquehanna from one side to the other. It’s on a map. You’ve got to look for it on the map. The guy who used to be the captain of that, a guy by the name of Jack Dillman, went on to become the captain of a ferry boat down in Harrisburg, which you could also travel on. And while you’re in Harrisburg you should take a look at the state capitol building.

Joan: Yes, that is a splendid architectural (gem).

Mike: An extraordinary accomplishment…Then on the way back up you come up on the easterly side of the Susquehanna because you’ve already seen the Westerly side and you drive up that way to get into Schuylkill County and just a whole bunch of little towns on the way up. I don’t have favorites, per se, because I try not to pick favorites. I think that’s a good thing because it rules everybody else out. But, you know, we travel through a town and you inevitably find something that was amusing or entertaining or just you know, a museum in Pottsville, where they keep cars – old cars. Those kinds of things. And so up in the Northeastern section maple syrup making is starting. Yes. In fact, it’s already started. I tried tracking a guy down the other day in the Moscow area who was making 250 gallons of sap. He had boiled on a Saturday afternoon and I wanted to go up and see that but I couldn’t find him.

Joan: Are you writing articles about this or are you doing any live broadcast work right now? You mentioned the maple syrup. Is this work-related?

Mike: Well, it’s kind of a mix. I’m trying to develop my own little system that I can use my own just for the fun of it and I do some things for 16. As far as a podcast or a blog, you know, it’s all like just fool with it and see if something works. I’ve gotten through life doing that and so you say to yourself, well, gee, maybe that’ll work. Maybe it won’t.

Joan: Much like we’re doing right now.

Mike: Yeah, we’re seeing how this works. We don’t know how it’s going to work. We’re going to sit here and shoot the breeze and talk about things and see how it goes. And that’s basically what I’m doing.

Joan: I would also like my listeners to know that this is not our first interview – that I interviewed you a couple of years ago. We both love to talk. And so this is a great opportunity.

Mike: Well, you were working in newspapers at the time.

Joan: Yes.

Mike: And yes, and that’s another thing that I lament. I must say, you know, there’s a lot of newspapers that have gone bankrupt across the country because of the internet and digital and I really find that to be sad. Now, locally, we’ve got a couple that are still doing okay and I hope that continues. I really do because you don’t find out about the pancake suppers all the time from the big metro papers. You got to go to these little places and find what’s going on in town. That’s where you find it, you know, and for the local newspaper, that’s the treasure. They really are.

Joan: There’s something about opening a book or opening a newspaper and reading it that you don’t get from digital publications. I’m not obviously putting them down but there’s just something (about them). Maybe it’s because we grew up with newspapers that we appreciate them so much, so much more. Well, one of the questions that I want to talk to you about is during our conversation about a week ago, you mentioned a trip you’d like to take. Where would you like to venture? Tell me more about the cross-country trek – what you’d like to see.

Mike: I’d like to do on the Pennsylvania Road in every state where Route 6 travels through. And Route 6, for those of you who are not close to the area, Route 6 goes east to west or west to east depending on how you look at it, but it goes coast to coast.

Joan: Where does it actually begin, if that’s not a ridiculous question? I have no idea where it begins, but I know where it ends.

Mike: Yeah, well it begins in the Atlantic Ocean.

Joan: Ok, so it was sort of a silly question.

Mike: Well, no, because it varies. It used to go coast-to-coast, specifically, but then what I found out is, California changed its highway numbering system several decades ago. And so that kind of cut off Route 6 before it hit the water in California. You can still go that route, per se, but I want to do what I’ve done in Pennsylvania all across the country. I just think when you go on an interstate, you have one intent in mind. That’s to get from point A to point B as fast as humanly possible and that the speed limit…

Joan: And avoid any kind of traffic or jams.

Mike: Yeah, but my goal on traveling Route 6 is to just travel it. The signs are easy to follow. I have a GPS in my vehicle, you know, which will take me from one point to the next and it’s what you find along the way. Charlie Bennett’s old fishing lure store or something.

Joan: Now when you do this, are you going to stop and talk to everyone or talk to certain people? Or is it more of a visual journey? Or do you anticipate you’ll actually do interviews, maybe not for a particular publication, but would you say that you’re going to do interviews or you just want to talk to people?

Mike: It’s a little bit of both. It depends on what actually develops. But again, it’s wanting to see America and not from the view of an interstate, where everything is bypassed at 75 miles an hour or more if you can get away with it.

Joan: Some places, right?

Mike: Yes, but I want to take Route 6 where the speed limit sometimes goes down to 35 miles an hour. Oh my goodness, we’ll never get there. That’s the point. Who cares? You can drive all the way across and if you see something, a covered bridge… There’s one out on Route 6 in Bradford County off to the right-hand side of the road. (It’s a) Beautiful covered bridge. I shot three dozen pictures there one afternoon just for the fun of it. But that’s the kind of stuff you find – the fairgrounds out in Bradford County. If they’re having a fair, you stop at the fair. Say hello. How are you doing? Shoot the breeze for a while and see what happens. Maybe you’ll run across the 800-pound pig or something.

That’s the way to see America in my mind. And that’s my goal. That’s my bucket list goal I think – one of my bucket list things.

Joan: Is to be able to see all of America east to west on Route 6?

Mike: Yes.

Joan: Do you have any idea when you might do this and is your wife ready for this, also?

Mike: Well, she’s kind of on the edge with it but I thought we’d warm up a little bit by going up to the New England coast on Route 6. Just to see what happens.

Joan: Say, “Honey, this is Route 6.”

Mike: Yeah, we’re going to go from here to I don’t know, Butte Montana, on Route 6. I don’t know where we’re going. But I think that to me is something I really want to do.

Joan: Well on that note, it has been an absolute pleasure interviewing you again, and I really appreciate that you’ve joined me at Keystone today. I want to give Keystone a huge thank you for allowing me to do this podcast in their recording studio.

Mike: It’s a nice Studio.

Joan: It is a wonderful studio and very comfortable. Yeah, and so again, thank you.

Mike: You’re welcome.

Joan: Best wishes with your trek across the country.

Mike: Thanks, Joan.

Joan: You’re welcome.

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Abu Dhabi Animals in their natural habitats Couple's Getaways Lifestyle Sri Lanka Travel guests Travel Stories Travel Stories to Help You Deal with COVID-19 What to see in Abu Dhabi What to see in India What to see in Sri Lanka What to see in the Maldives Where to find peace in troubled times

Sri Lanka to Abu Dhabi

Sri Lanka to Abu Dhabi A Couple's Getaway

A Couple’s Getaway

Anant and Alka Patel Experience Breathtaking Wildlife and Culture

Enjoy these guest travel stories from around the world.

Sri Lanka to Abu Dhabi recaps a couple’s getaway to India, Maldives, Sri Lanka, and UAE-Abu Dhabi. This interview with Anant Patel epitomizes what itinerant travelers are eager to experience again: travel and culture. Anant and his wife, Alka, were on a monthlong adventure that brought them to some of the world’s most captivating destinations. Their children are grown and living on their own giving this couple the time and freedom to explore.

You will be captivated by their story and photos that depict a more peaceful time. Enjoy this interview and continue to dream of your next vacation.

Sri Lanka Breathtaking Scenery and Wildlife
An elephant herd in Sri Lanka provided a rare opportunity to see these majestic creatures in their natural habitat.

Where were you born and raised?


Anant: My wife and are of Indian origin.  I was born in Yemen during British rule. Both my dad and mom are Indian born.  My wife was born in India. We’ve lived away from India since the late 70s.  Both of our families are from the State of Gujarat.  Our hometowns are located in small villages.

Were you celebrating a milestone birthday or anniversary?


Anant: We planned to attend our friend’s son’s destination wedding so we attended the wedding celebration and added our own travels for our 32nd Anniversary celebration.

What was your favorite destination and how were they all meaningful?

Anant: There so many beautiful places we visited but the Maldives was our favorite from a relaxation perspective.  The all-inclusive hotel we stayed at occupies the entire small island so all you can do is relax by the beautiful beaches with crystal clear water.  The pure scenic views and privacy made it an enjoyable stay in the Maldives.

Did you stay in hotels, inns, or other type of lodging?

Anant: All of the countries we visited, we stayed in hotels.

Did you participate in guided tours or self-guided sightseeing?

Anant: We did the self-guided sightseeing with a private driver for car transportation.  

Romantic roads through Sri Lanka
The couple traveled Sri Lanka’s romantic roads.

What experiences would you classify as pivotal?

Anant: In Sri Lanka, we visited their national parks to see the elephants and the leopards. The raw presence of wildlife in those parks was just breathtaking.  We saw elephants in the wild where you can just reach out and touch them.  We were fortunate to see two elephant herds near a water body and a leopard up close. That is rare.  

A Sri Lanka Leopard Up Close
Anant and Alka’s leopard sighting in Sri Lanka during a wildlife safari

What are some of your observations about the India leg of your journey?

Anant: Since the 70s, India’s infrastructure has improved significantly.   The poverty is there but the famine of the past is gone.  People are doing a lot better.  The use of cell phones is everywhere and people are very well informed and know many apps very well and can teach me new tricks.  

Even poor people use cell phones so the awareness level is high.  With the Modi government in place for the past five years, in the next five years, the infrastructure will be at a different level with so many roads, railway, and hospital improvements. The country will be well prepared for the future.

The hotel and tourism industry is doing well and many foreigners are pouring into India. There is room for improvement in the availability of the public restrooms that are clean and up to modern standards. It has improved a lot since I left in the 70s but still requires more work.  

South India landscape and beauty
South India is known for its natural beauty from scenic coastal towns to a hill station getaway like Munnar.

What are some of the highlights of your time in India?

Anant: Specifically, seeing our families after such a long period – for me, 42 years and 52 years for my wife. We visited Goa for the first time, which is a beautiful coastal town, the natural beauty of the State of Kerala with the hill station getaway like Munnar, tea and spice plantations in Thekkady, and the backwaters of Allepy.  

Also, the southern food is cooked differently thus we enjoyed many southern dishes at various locations. People were very friendly but the language barrier was very noticeable. In South India, they do not speak our national language Hindi very well and most people speak very little English compared to North India.  

We enjoyed our trip and still have much more exploring to do so we will go back in the future.  

Maldives romantic getaways
Crystal-clear water, luxurious sandy beaches and plenty of privacy are the words Anant Patel used to describe their time in the Maldives.

Many thanks to Anant for sharing his adventures. Message me with your questions about their trip and I’ll get the answers for you.

If you’d like to share your travel story, contact me. This guest series will run indefinitely as a public service to all travelers who, in spite of travel restrictions, want an emotional reprieve from the isolation COVID-19 has ensued.

Stay safe and healthy.

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