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Fly Fishing in Pennsylvania

Joan Matsui Fly Fisher Travel Writer

On the Water in Northeastern Pennsylvania

A Fly-Fishing Journal by Joan Matsui Travel Writer

Fly-Fishing in Pennsylvania is a weekly summer journal that highlights my most recent efforts to learn to fly fish.

Fly fishing became one of my all-time favorite hobbies about eight years ago after my brother died. He was an avid fisherman and fly fishing brought me comfort and helped with the grieving process. Is my brother making fun of me and criticizing my cast? I’m sure he is.

The most successful anglers I know told me that fly fishing is a life-long learning process. Fly-Fishing Weekly brings you a mix of the best-of and not-so-good days on the water.

Patience is as important as skill. Fly-fishing in Pennsylvania sheds a positive light on the sport. Follow my journey here every week during the summer for tales from the water.

Several years ago, I met a seasoned angler, Jim, while I was wading in the Delaware River. Jim has fished since he was a child. I whined a bit to him that day. Afterward, I was embarrassed because I know not everyone catches fish every time but I needed to let go of my negative emotions so I could move on to a more positive attitude. Letting go was one way to remove my mental barriers.

I didn’t catch anything today, I told him.

His reply, “There are weeks when I don’t catch a fish. It’s not always a particular technique that dictates if you catch a fish. Water temperature and water level play a major role in whether the fish are biting or not. And of course, you also need to consider the fly you’re using.”

He’s correct, at least as far as I can tell. Overall, my technique has immensely improved thanks to practice, an Orvis Fly-Fishing 101 class, and guidance from my fishing friends. Almost eight years into fly fishing, I can roll cast and select a fly that’s somewhat palatable to the fish. That’s a definite improvement.

Hot summer days are problematic. Wading in cool water is a fisher’s delight but the trout, notably a cold water species don’t agree.

The last time I was out on the water – yesterday – fish were rising but unfortunately, did not take any of the flies I threw out. I began with a small nymph and three to four minutes later, I discovered my hook was caught on an underwater branch or it was stuck to the side of a rock. After breaking the line free, I noticed my fly was gone.

When in doubt, I resort to my favorite flies, an elk-hair caddis pattern or a blue-winged olive. Woolly Buggers are an option but they tend to plop, rather than quietly land on the water. I’m working on casting streamers.

Joan Matsui Fly Fisher Travel Writer
Spring is my favorite time of year to fly fish for trout. This day was a combined fly fishing and photography trip.

Two weeks ago, I brought my oldest son along on a two-hour evening trip to the Lackawanna River, a tributary to the mighty Susquehanna River. The water level had dropped significantly from last week but fishing conditions were nearly perfect. NO FISH!

Typically, by the end of June, the water temperature rises as the rainy days of June disappear. Fly fishing in Pennsylvania is challenging to say the least. Here we are in July, the hottest and most humid month of the year in Northeastern Pennsylvania, with a jump in our air temps to 85 to 90 degrees for several days at a time.

Joan Matsui Travel Writer Fly Fishing
The pensive look while hoping at least one trout would take the fly. Northeastern Pennsylvania has some outstanding streams and rivers.

Today, my friend Amy and I met along the Lackawanna River. Amy arrived about an hour before me and had already moved upstream from where we planned to meet. She caught three or four fish in an hour but by 10 a.m., the sun was bright and only a few shaded areas remained along the banks. We were optimistic we’d see some fish rise and we did but again, they weren’t interested in our flies. Once Amy and I commence with fishing, we don’t want to stop.

We ended our afternoon perhaps a bit discouraged but the diehard angler never completely gives in to frustration. After all, there are six more days this week.

Fly fishing in Pennsylvania is as much about learning where to fish as it is about technique. Plan your trip with this guide to Pennsylvania waterways. Find the best places to fly fish.

Happy fishing to you!

Learn to fly fish with Orvis Fly-Fishing 101 certified instructors.

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Flies for Fly Fishing fly fishing equipment Lifestyle Nairobi Fly Fishing and Tying

NAIROBI CITY FLY TIER

  • By
  • August 15, 2018
Nairobi City Fly Tier Fred Kangai
Nairobi City Fly Tyer
Fred Kangai began his fly-tying career in Nairobi City, Kenya’s capital city. He currently owns his own business selling his flies around the world.

NAIROBI CITY FLY-TIER:

CUSTOMER SERVICE: MEETING CUSTOMER NEEDS

Nairobi City is Kenya’s capital and a hub of activities embraced by people from all over the country. Fred Kangai Luyali’s life in Nairobi began years ago. He arrived there and accepted a position as a fly-tier at a fly-tying company. Fred trained for six months and ultimately, resigned to start his own fly-tying business.

Joan Matsui Receives Fly Samples
Fred contacted me via email and offered to send fly samples to me. Once the rain is replaced by sun and the water level in our rivers and streams drops, I’ll be sure to try each and every one.

According to Fred, his employees consist of experienced men and women who source his orders from local firms.

“Here we tie according to the client’s sample and then ship directly to clients abroad,” Fred said via an email interview.

Mandated Company Training

Before a person can achieve the status as a fly tier, he or she must undergo a special training of not less than six months. To qualify, the individual must take the company’s mandated training program that’s only done inside the company.

Fred explained many companies in Kenya rely mostly on clients outside the country and he and his team work round the clock to meet their international clients’ needs. The proceeds, he says, help to improve their living standard.

While supplying flies is his business, Fred hasn’t followed what we might consider a natural progression – learning to fly fish before taking on tying. Fred said, “I know nothing as fly fishing is concerned. I only know how to tie flies.”

Nymphs, dry, wet, streamers, saltwater, salmon patterns, bass bugs, and poppers are among the files he and his team of fly-tying specialists craft. He noted he gets the flies from local factories as sub-contracts and then they are returned and to his company to make the finished product. He incorporates many materials commonly used by tiers around the world: deerskin, hackle feathers, tippet peacock herls and his favorite pattern and most productive fly is the Goddard Caddis, a classic high-floating dry fly imitation that’s known for its large and bushy appearance.

Fred said special care is taken to be sure the flies he sells are tied tightly to the hook to avoid loose ends. His flies have a neat finish and are a hit with his customers because he uses the exact materials and hooks they request.

“they (my tiers) tie and deliver on time, and our flies are packed so they reach our clients undamaged. my flies need a lot of attention to avoid mistakes made by tiers in order to satisfy my client,” he said.

Does he plan to learn to fly fish? Fred said he hopes to learn in the future. “I need to learn more as far as fishing is concerned.”

You can contact Fred or request a brochure here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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